See You In Monterey

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Hope to see you there!

Here’s what I’ll be up to:

Sunday Nov 14th
Workshop 19
Make Learning Stick: Creating 5-Star, User-Centered Training & Instruction

1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library
D. Scott Brandt, Professor & Technology Training Librarian, Purdue University, & Columnist for Computers in Libraries

Once you have assessed and identified user needs, you?re ready to build a lesson plan or course module to guide the learning. This update of the popular workshop, ?Teaching the Internet in 60 Minutes,? is taught by a dynamic duo representing both academic and public library backgrounds. It uses a building-block approach to create effective, user-centered learning that focuses on measurable outcomes. You will learn how to:
? Categorize learning objectives into five categories of performance.
? Ensure learner outcomes can be demonstrated and measured.
? Focus learning into performance steps that are complete and achievable.
? Select teaching strategies that match objectives for fun and interesting learning.
? Apply two methods to demonstrate and reinforce learning.
Illustrating with many examples from successful Internet-related modules taught in both academic and public library settings, speakers show modules on browser and e-mail management, searching, and digital reference. With theory made practical, in-class practice using these techniques, and demonstrations of real-world training/instruction, this workshop is fast-paced and highly interactive! (Can be combined with workshop 13, ?Understanding Your Learners Needs,? for a complete immersion in training and instruction theories and techniques.)

Tuesday Nov. 16
Creating Internet-Savvy Patrons

11:30 a.m. ? 12:15 p.m.
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library
Jamie Wilson, Middle School Librarian, Tower Hill School (DE)

A prerequisite for much of the training and instruction that librarians do starts with patrons who are savvy users, of computers in general and the Internet specifically. Universities and corporations may take it for granted that their students, staff, and employees have gained such experience, but it takes front-line librarians in public and school libraries to ensure skills and knowledge are taught. We?ll hear some tips on dealing with patrons with a wide variety of skills and experience, and how to deal with and respond to student perceptions of the Web.

Get ?Em Started?Teaching Weblogs to Staff
3:15 p.m. ? 4:00 p.m.
Steven M. Cohen, Assistant Librarian, Rivkin Radler, LLP
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library & Blogger for Tame the Web

In order to have Weblogs work in the library environment, be it corporate, academic, or even public, staff need to be trained on how to use the technology so that they can use it to best serve their clients. This session discusses methods and theories on how to best train your staff for the Weblog revolution.

Wednesday Nov. 17
Instant Messaging (IM)

1:15 p.m. ? 2:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Aaron Schmidt, Reference Librarian, Thomas Ford Memorial Library
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library, & Blogger for Tame the Web
May Chang, Web Development Librarian, NCSU Libraries
Daniel C. Mack, Humanities Librarian, Roberta Astroff, Humanities Librarian, Ashley Robinson, Gateway Librarian & Gary W. White, Head, Shreyer Business Library, Pennsylvania State University

A 2003 survey indicated that nearly 70 percent of the U.S. university Internet population used IM. This session covers research, applications, case studies, usage, workflow impact, and ethics of IM. Schmidt and Stephens look at the many uses of IM, from in-house staff communication, to the delivery of content and discussions with customers. Chang reviews IM developments in consumer grade services and open source applications, issues of security and interoperability, and IM as a productivity tool. She draws on the experience of NCSU Libraries, where an open source IM system was recently deployed for in-house communication. The Penn State team discusses models of ethical behavior for electronic communications available in libraries (IM, e-mail, virtual
reference), their effective use with various populations of library users, and how to maintain high ethical standards in all areas of interpersonal electronic communications.

More will follow…

Oh – and Steven mentioned messaging at the conference. I’m all for it! My AIM name is mstephens7mac!

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