Was told this is a new library.



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12 thoughts on “Was told this is a new library.”

  1. Heheh… nope…No smoking is a GOOD thing…it’s the fact that a new library in 2010 still puts a “No Cell Phone Use” clause on the door. No texting? No accessing the catalog via the phone’s browser?

  2. If Michael weren’t so anal, he’d probably figure out that they don’t mean texting or accessing the catalog or using the cell phone to download a digital book. They probably mean talking on it about all kinds of things no one else in the library cares to hear.

    Michael, why don’t you leave academia and get a library all your own, then we could spend our time finding fault with your policies. Me thinks you need to get a life.

  3. I agree that academics can get a bit disconnected from front line libraries. I also think that front line librarians can unintentionally develop an adversarial relationship with the patrons. In my library, instead of “don’t do this, don’t do that” signs, we try to make areas where people can engage in desired activities. We go for signs that read, “Please enjoy food and drink in the cafe” or “Cell phones are welcome on the first floor.” Its amazing what a little positive language can do for the attitude of everyone involved.

  4. One public library in my area plastered their library with no cell phone signs at one time and they really still try to enforce this, though many of the signs have come down. They do mean no talking, texting, browsing, etc. It is amazing. I never turn my phone off there and I am tempted to turn on the ringer but I never have the ringer on so probably wouldn’t recognize it if my phone did ring.

  5. But the “no cell phone” rule STILL doesn’t make sense, even if you just mean talking. Are people allowed to talk in the library? If there are rules about the having to talk softly, what difference does it make whether you are talking on a cell phone or to another person who is with you? There’s just no need for the extra rule.

  6. I was at a office that had a sign no cell phones and it didn’t make sense to me at all. The office workers were behind a wall. How is using a cell phone any different then talking to the person next to you? I was using mine to check my email.

    I agree people should be able to use them in the library.

  7. Have you folks ever actually listed to the shit people talk about on there cell phones in libraries. Most of them are so wrapped up in thier own little worlds that they have no idea that they’re bothering the hell out of everyone else. Patrons talk while they’re on the internet pcs — totally disrupting everyone else. I had a lady describe in graphic detail how a doctor lanced her boil. It would be one thing if people had common sense and some manners but hey, It’s every man for himself now-a-days and no one cares that they’re cell phone use is disruptive.

    I live this stuff every day. Do you folks.

  8. It seems to me that the intent of the sign is to try and convey the message “Please be considerate of others.”

    it could probably been stated more eloquently, but I do realize that there is limited space on a sign and it is necessary to try and be concise.

    i don’t believe that cell phone use in and of itself in the library is disruptive, if it is done in a brief and discreet manner. However when people start prattling on about what they had for breakfast, or who did what to whom and how often, while other patrons begin to glare at them, it is time to ask them to take the conversation elsewhere.

  9. I think the real point is that people are rude and have stupid conversations in the library with or without a cell phone, so why should they be handled differently?

  10. Hey folks,

    Enough with the flames. You don’t have to like the post, or sign, or anything else.

    Regardless of your opinion, please be nice. I embarrassed to think that librarians would be so rude.

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