All posts by Michael

#TxLA14: Thanks Texas Library Association! Slides & Resources

txlaHow wonderful it is to be back at Texas Library Association! The good folks here know how to throw a great conference. Here are the slides and resources from my talk:

Slides: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensTxLALearning.pdf

The presentation is based in part on these columns:

A Genius Idea?: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

Learning Everywhere: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

Learning to Learn: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-to-learn-office-hours/

Infinite Learning: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/michael-stephens/infinite-learning-office-hours/

Of MOOCs & Mayhem Tomorrow at TxLA

Texas Library Association knows how to throw a conference! So nice to see colleagues and friends. Here’s the abstract for my talk tomorrow morning:

Of MOOCs & Mayhem: Learning Everywhere

9:00 – 9:50 Am

An innovation in online education is the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). These courses can have thousands of people and can be a potentially disruptive and transformational mechanism for large-scale learning. Hear the genesis of MOOCs, the experiences of librarians in an LIS-centered MOOC, and the potential roles for LIS professionals. This emerging landscape is rife with chaos and opportunity!

Michael Stephens, San Jose State University (San Jose, CA).

ILI Final Call for Proposals – TTW is a Proud Blog Supporter of ILI

Submissions deadline this Friday, 11 April 2014

This is the final call for speakers for this year’s Internet Librarian International- THE innovation and technology conference attracting hundreds of global library and information professionals each year.

The full Call for Speakers is available here.

Taking place in London on 20 – 22 October 2014, we’re seeking international case studies, How-Tos and discussions in a variety of new formats – see below – that promote the exchange of knowledge and experience, and demonstrate how you are using transformative new ideas and services to make a positive impact on your organisation. Under the theme, Positive Change: Creating Real Impactwe’re looking for a range of presentation formats, including:

  • 30-minute scene-setting themed papers
  • 15-minute case study presentations
  • Teachmeet/unconference contributors
  • Workshop leaders
  • Panellists

The submissions deadline is this Friday, 11 April 2014 so don’t delay! Now’s the time to share your expertise, and be a part of this influential and forward-thinking event - Submit today.

 

ILI Blog Supporters
Stephen Abram Informed Jo Alcock John DiGiglio Jan Holmquist
Brian Kelly anabelmarsh.flavors.me Shelf Free Michael Stephens Aaron Tay

Office Hours: A Genius Idea

shamingMy new column is up at Library Journal:

Let’s unpack this sweeping suggestion for improving libraries further. What of teaching ability? I advise my students to make sure they take courses in user instruction and technology, no matter where they want to work. Delivering instruction should be a part of every professional’s skill set: in a training room, across the desk, in the stacks, on the fly. Maybe it’s time to add creating a short training session or learning module to the interview process for all librarians, not just those in colleges or schools.

Borrowed from Apple, the Genius Bar concept applied to libraries is not new, but it’s a welcome addition to many library settings. David Weinberger, in “The Library as Platform” (ow.ly/­tBDAe), notes that the Genius Bar might be one of many channels for users to interact with librarians. Libraries such as DOK Delft and others have tried various permutations of walk-in tech ­assistance.

Don’t miss the comments, including this interesting  snippet from a reader named Dan:

“after reading the shaming post, i am conflicted which is more absurd: the original note or all the “followers” and their “likes.” technology has it’s place but you will have to pry the hard-copy, three-dimensional, fixed ink on paper, book from my cold dead, fingers.”

Insert witty reply here.

:-)

Also – a big shout out to Monica Harris and her creation culture course she’s teaching this semester at SJSU SLIS as I prep an introductory module on creation in libraries for our new core LIBR 200 course Information Communities.

“LIS curricula must keep up as well. At San José State University (SJSU), CA, School of Library and Information Science (SLIS), we’re offering a new class entitled “Production of Knowledge and Content in Libraries,” taught by Monica Harris, deputy director, Schaumburg Township District Library, IL. Her syllabus, focused on participation and creativity, runs from digital creation spaces to the Maker movement to a module called the Importance of Informal Learning. Another unit highlights Robotics and Electronics: Arduino, Sensors, and LEGO.”

I am impressed with the framework Monica used to explore knowledge creation in libraries. The students in the course will have some invaluable experience for this new landscape.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

http://librarian-shaming.tumblr.com/post/68672130972/i-want-to-replace-all-librarians-with-tech-people

Thanks ILEAD U!

Thanks to all the great folks participating in ILEAD U for the warm welcome the morning for my keynote.

The slides are here:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensLearningEverywhereILEADU.pdf

The presentation is based in part on these columns:

A Genius Idea?: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

Learning Everywhere: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

Learning to Learn: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-to-learn-office-hours/

Infinite Learning: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/michael-stephens/infinite-learning-office-hours/

classroom

#PLA2014 Hyperlinked Learning Experiences

classroom

Greetings from #PLA2014 in Indianapolis.

The slides for my talk today are here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensPLA2014Learning.pdf

The presentation is based in part on these columns:

Reflective Practice: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/01/opinion/michael-stephens/reflective-practice-office-hours/

Learning Everywhere: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

Learning to Learn: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-to-learn-office-hours/

Infinite Learning: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/michael-stephens/infinite-learning-office-hours/

 

See You at PLA

hyperlibMOOCI am excited to be speaking at the Public Library Conference in Indianapolis.  See you there!

Thursday, March 13, 2014
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM
135-136

Hyperlinked Learning Experiences at Public Libraries: MOOCs & Beyond

This presentation will explore emerging models of connected, open learning—offered for free— with great potential for staff and the public. Can we support students of all kinds in Massive Open Online Courses? What’s the potential for professional development and lifelong learning when courses can gather the best of the best in a field and offer experiences and exploration anywhere? This session will explore new ideas and thinking about learning at the library.

Note: any #hyperlibMOOC participants attending, please say hello. I have name tag ribbons and Stickygrams for you.

Really? No Place for Collaboration at the Library

exetersignsVia Pam the Librarian:

http://pamlibrarian.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/kicked-out-of-the-library/

Last week I went to the Exeter Public Library with a colleague to work on a project for our high school. We needed Internet access, a table to spread our documents out on, an outlet to plug-in our devices, a spot away from the distractions of our school, and a buzzing atmosphere where we would feel inspired to create new ideas for our project. What better place than the local library?

We arrived to a very still and silent library. Two women behind the main desk looked at us as we walked in and went back to work. Patrons were sitting in chairs reading newspapers. There were some available study carrels in the corners. No group tables near outlets.

We tried the second floor. We were faced with several empty chairs and study carrels and signs that say “no talking.” There was an empty “meeting room” with no table and no chairs. Another meeting room was locked.

Because it was 10 a.m. we went into the Teen room (which is located directly behind the Reference desk.) The room is empty because it is a Friday and all of the teens in town are in school. We sat at a booth with an outlet and spread out our documents. As soon as we started working we were interrupted by a staff member who said that we are not allowed to work in there because we would intimidate the teens. I jokingly suggested that the fact that we are high school teachers/librarians could gain us access to this empty room. The librarian did not think it was funny and asked us to leave. I asked her for a suggestion of a location where we could work together at a table near an outlet. She said there are outlets all over the walls but could think of no table near an outlet. She recommended we try the second floor and I said that we will need to talk about our project. She reminded us we are not allowed to talk on the second floor.

We packed up and spent the day at Me & Ollie’s cafe where we sat on couches around a coffee table near an outlet surrounded by the buzz of the cafe. A young woman was reading a book next to us. An older man was typing hurriedly on his laptop on the other side. People were having meetings, drinking coffee, and getting business done. We were welcomed by the staff. They made us tea. And we got our work done.

This is unfortunate. I get that maybe adults shouldn’t be in the teen area without a teen, but maybe an exception could be made? And maybe some space for working together should be in the works soon. I did check out the library’s web site and Facebook. Looks like they had mini golf last year in the library! Maybe someone from the library should comment. Maybe it was just an off day?

I would suggest a “kindness audit” of signage though. :-)

Quiet

New San Rafael Library Web Site

Sarah Houghton writes:

http://librarianinblack.net/librarianinblack/2014/03/new-san-rafael-public-library-website.html

I’m pleased to announce that last week we launched a new website for San Rafael Public Library athttp://srpubliclibrary.org. The site was designed by Influx with their Prefab library website service. We are very happy with it!

websitescreenshot

Our library is relatively small and we don’t have the time or staff brain bandwidth or expertise to design, maintain, troubleshoot, and host a website. We were happy to hire Influx to do this work for us. For very little money a whole lot of pressure and stress has been relieved from our collective library brain.

So far, we’ve gotten some really fabulous feedback from library users, stakeholders, and city government officials.  Take a look, let us know what you think, and check out Influx if you’re looking for a quick, customizable (and yet still ready out-of-the box) website solution!

This is an impressive redesign. If you are looking for a Web refries, take a look at Influx and their Prefab library website service.