Category Archives: ALA News & Such

TTW Endorses Barb Stripling for ALA President – Please Vote

I met Barb at our SLIS reception at PLA – I appreciate her views and focus on learning of all kinds within our field. In the course of our discussion, she told me that she continues to learn and take on new challenges. That view aligns with my own about the profession. Please vote for Barb.

Here’s the text of an email I received from her campaign:

Dear Colleague,

As a leader of ALA, you know the importance of voting for the presidential candidate who can provide strong vision and leadership for our association at this challenging and exciting time for libraries. I believe you will decide that I am that candidate.

I am a proven collaborative leader who builds teams, plans strategically, and moves large systems to more effective practices. My deep experience in ALA as a division president, ALA Executive Board member, and ALA Councilor has prepared me to lead ALA in a transformation process to make it more inclusive, diverse, and collaborative. I will listen to the voices of our members and ensure that ALA becomes more interactive and dynamic.

We are at a critical point in libraries and librarianship. Under my presidency, ALA will coalesce and assert national leadership in critical issues facing our field, including equitable access to e-publications, library funding, the value of libraries and librarians, preservation and curation in the digital environment, and the essential educational and community-building role of libraries. ALA will provide support to our members across the country as you transform your libraries to meet the priorities of your communities.

As president, I will champion the values of intellectual freedom and equitable access to information in all formats. I will use ALA’s voice to create strong public will for libraries of all types.

Please visit my website to find out why you will want to vote for Barbara Stripling as ALA President (http://www.barbarastripling.org). I ask for your vote and your endorsement to your network of colleagues. Thank you.

Barb

Barbara Stripling
Assistant Professor of Practice, Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
Phone: (315) 443-1069
Email: barbara@barbarastripling.org 
Web: http://www.barbarastripling.org
Twitter: @BarbStripling
LinkedIn: barbarastripling

TTW Endorsements for ALA Elections

Hello all! We usually have not endorsed too many folks over the years here at TTW, but this year here are some folks I’d urge you to vote for:

Martin Garnarhttp://www.facebook.com/martin.garnar.ALA I caught up with Martin at PLA and had a great chat with him about ethics and intellectual freedom.  We need his voice!

Karen Schneiderhttp://freerangelibrarian.com/ “The user is not broken” still resonates. Karen’s reflections and thoughts about libraries, technology and our constituents speak to me.

Please consider voting for them!

Web 2.0 & Libraries Parts 1 & 2 Available Free on Hyperlinked Library Site

I am happy to announce the full text of both of my ALA Library Technology Reports are available now at the new TTW companion site The Hyperlinked Library.

The rest of the site is currently under construction, but for now you’ll find:

Web 2.0 & Libraries: Best Practices for Social Software (2006) – http://thehyperlinkedlibrary.org/libtechreport1/

Web 2.0 & Libraries: Trends & Technologies (2007) – http://thehyperlinkedlibrary.org/libtechreport2/

Special thanks to my SJSU SLIS grad assistant Patrick Siebold who worked very hard the past few weeks inputting the content. I know the examples from ’06 and ’07 may seem out of date and quaint in some ways, but I’m very proud of the framework we used for the works back then. Conversations, Community, Connections, Collaborations – all those great C words Jenny Levine and I used throughout our early social software roadshows in 2005 & 2006 provide a useful context for looking at Web 2.0. I hope these works are still useful to some of you. Comments are open for adding more to the chapters and I plan on doing some types of updating as time permits.

The site will also serve my course Web sites and other items related to my teaching. 

Jason Griffey signs off Perpetual Beta

Jason Griffey writes:

On December 28, I received notice from George M. Eberhart, the editor ofAmerican Libraries Direct, that my contract with American Libraries for Perpetual Beta is not being renewed. As of December 31, my involvement with this experiment in blogging will end.

Perpetual Beta was, to my knowledge, the first American Libraries blog written by a non-staff member. It was originally conceived of by myself and former Associate Editor Sean Fitzpatrick as a way of highlighting edgy, interesting tech that pushed the boundaries of what might be considered “library technology.” I tried very hard to curate the content that it linked to in such a way that it might help illustrate where libraries have opportunities in technology that might not be completely obvious. I hope that some of you out there in Libraryland found it useful, and got some measure of value out of the two years that I’ve been writing and curating Perpetual Beta.

The content that exists here on Perpetual Beta will continue to live here, so don’t worry about links breaking just yet. And while American Libraries may use this site or the Perpetual Beta name for other projects, if you’re looking for my stuff … well, here’s a short list of where you can still find my writing:

I’m still deciding what I will do with the sort of content that I curated for Perpetual Beta. I may create a new site for it, or I may continue to use my Tumblr blog (http://perpetualbeta.tumblr.com/) to collect this sort of thing. Whatever I choose to do, if you’re interested in what I’ve done here at Perpetual Beta over the last two years, keep an eye on the above and I’ll announce it as soon as possible.

I’ve always appreciated Jason’s take on bleeding edge technology… be sure to follow/check out the links he shares above.

What Are Words For? from Steven V. Kaszynski

From The Go Librarians,  Steven V. Kaszynski writes:

http://golibrarians.wordpress.com/2011/03/11/what-are-words-for/

Everybody loves ALA’s classic celebrity READ posters. And for good reason. Multi-age, culturally relevant celebrities inspiring multi-age people to read books and get literate. They’re popular and possibly even effective. Still, the READ poster is alone in its work. It wants a family. It needs siblings.

Libraries continue to evolve and struggle against their own underrepresentation. They seek ways to break the mold. The READ campaign advocates literacy and promotes the library as a literacy center or, from a non-LIS perspective, a place to get free books. But isn’t that the very stereotype we’re trying to conquer? For all the good the READ posters may do toward promoting literate communities, they may concurrently, from a library science point of view, perpetuate the traditional stereotype of the library as “a place to get free books.”

LEARN. PLAY. CONNECT. ENGAGE. CREATE. These are the sibling marketing terms that libraries and ALA should advertise along with the classic READ poster. These are the terms that help represent what libraries are all about. What terms would you like to see on that ALA poster at the bus stop?

I can imagine some wonderful posters centered around the words Steven shares in the post. They also do a good job of summing up what LIS education should be about!

Justin and the 8bit tat he got at Annual

One of the highlights for my very brief time at ALA Annual in DC was having lunch with Justin Hoenke, He writes for TTW as a Contributor, blogs at 8BitLibrary and other blogs, and was a 2010 Emerging Leader on Team J. I was the Team J mentor.

Take a look at this: http://blog.8bitlibrary.com/2010/07/08/project-brand-yourself-a-librarian-the-aftermath-part-1/

Justin added a Link (I had it wrong – updated!) tattoo to his collection, which also includes a library logo on the other arm. (See http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelsphotos/4743185541

What a unique way to spread the word about libraries (and gaming in libraries). It’ll be a great conversation starter for Justin on planes and out in the world. :-)

I must also say I’m so excited to see the young librarians like Justin working so hard at improving service – checkout some of his posts about what he’s done in libraries - as well as making change in our associations and organizations.

To Justin: Well done, Sir!

On ALA Emerging Leaders (the conclusion)

Team JBot (Justin Hoenke, Rafia Mirza, Jeannie Chen, Anne Krakow, Susan Jennings)

Phew…time flies.  It’s been six months since my first post on being an Emerging Leader and now that I’ve “emerged”, what have I learned?  Here goes.

THE PROJECT AND THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION

To view the full report from our project, click here.

As a project, our group was tasked with surveying librarians about “how web 2.0 should ALA go with ALA.org”.  Before we jumped in, our first goal was setting up communication.  Be it ALA Connect, Google Talk, or even a simple email, as an Emerging Leader you learn to embrace any form of communication.  And you also learn how to communicate…

Working virtually is no easy task.  Things can get confusing pretty quickly.  The approach of the JBots was to create a never-ending open dialog.  For this to work, we all brought open minds to the table.  Five equal partners who share the same goal.  Sounds great, but did it work?  Yes.

Having had a long discussion on communication at the beginning saved us a lot of hassle as we dug deeper into our project.  When our project got derailed for a moment, we didn’t panic.  We talked and made it through.

DESTROYING THE STEREOTYPE

Over the past six months, I’ve heard just about every stereotype that one could dream up of about the Emerging Leaders project. It is an elite group.  It is nothing but busy work for ALA.  It’s all about the connections you make. Say what you want, but having gone through the project I will say this: it is all about the experience.

The Emerging Leaders program gives us a chance to grow both as a person and as a librarian.  Life has its ups and downs, and so did our project.  However, I’m not going to dwell on those or bore you with the details.  Everything I said in my original post on this topic still rings true.  I feel much more confident about moving forward as the teen librarian in my community as well as a professional within the greater scope of ALA.

Those stereotypes we talked about above?  They’re nothing but chains holding us back.  Let’s destroy them and grow.

WE ARE FAMILY

Cue that Sister Sledge song while you read this section.

Randomly tossed together at the beginning of the project, our little group (which we dubbed “JBots”) grew into a little family.  Now, I know what you’re thinking.  Families are FULL of weird stuff.  But as I said above, let’s destroy that stereotype and look forward.  Families are units with a common goal who share a common love for each other.  I think that’s the way my group evolved.

All of our group interactions, decisions, and final output were the product of working together as a family.  Emerging Leaders groups grow from nothing into something that you will keep for the rest of your life.  You gain friends who will be with you every step of the way.  These friends will not forget about the little things.  They’ll be there with a simple “great job” or “thank you” just when you need it.  They’ll be there to share ideas and challenge you to be a leader EVERY DAY FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.  Good stuff.

-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor

—–

Info on the 2011 ALA Emerging Leaders program can be found here

Click here to read “On ALA Emerging Leaders“, which talks about my experience as I began the ALA Emerging Leaders program.

(as a companion  piece to this post, might I recommend this wonderful post by @charbooth)


Survey: How Web 2.0 Should ALA Go?

For Immediate Release
Thu, 05/13/2010 – 16:11

Contact: Louise M Gruenberg
ITTS

ALA is planning a web redevelopment in the next year.  To ensure that the changes to the website satisfy members’ needs, ALAstakeholders should tell us: Just how Web 2.0 should ALA go? When you visit the ALA website, does it meet your expectations? Would you prefer to be able to customize, personalize, share, comment, and rank? Team J of Emerging Leaders needs to know what you want out of your ALA.org experience.  We have made it our mission to survey our members to determine how and to what extent members would like to interact on ALA.org.

Please click here to go to the survey

Please take 15-30 minutes to fill out the questions in the eleven rating scales.  There are also six optional demographic questions.  Your responses to all questions will be confidential and anonymous. Submission of the survey implies consent for Team J to use your answers in our analysis and recommendations. The deadline for completing the survey is Sunday, May 23rd at 11:45 PM.

Results from the survey will be presented in a poster session at 2010 ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC. They will also be used by the Website Advisory Committee and the Web Editorial Board as they make their strategic plans for the site.

Should you have any questions or problems, please contact any member of Team J, either through our staff liaison, Louise Gruenberg, ALA’s Sr. Usability Officer or by sending us a message in ALA Connect or at projectjbots@gmail.com.   Thank you for your assistance with our project!

TEAM J

  • Jeannie Chen
  • Justin Hoenke
  • Susan Jennings
  • Anne Krakow
  • Rafia Mirza

Note from Michael: I am proud to say I’m serving as mentor to this group of dynamic emerging leaders. Please take the survey and help them help ALA.

Gadgets and Gizmos: Personal Electronics and the Library by Jason Griffey

Don’t miss Jason Griffey’s new Library Technology Report. Covering all types of gadgets and devices, Griffey offers an concise, useful overview of all of the choices. Most importantly, he emphasizes the need to keep up with emerging tech and understand how it might fit into the information ecology of our users. From the closing chapter:

Gadgets give you the opportunity to show off new and exciting technologies to those who may never own one for themselves, in much the same way that libraries have found that providing computers and Internet access was an important function of the late twentieth-century library. They allow you to extend your services and do more with less. If you haven’t tried out an e-reader or an iPod Touch, or if you just think the idea of a talking elec- tronic rabbit is odd enough to be interesting, try some gadgets out in your library. You might be surprised how much you, and your patrons, like them.

We’re moving into the period of time when, as I said in my introduction, content and container are distinct. Librarians are very good at dealing with content . . . it’s what we are trained for. I hope that this gave you an intro- duction to the containers of our content in the new digi- tal world.

Now get out there and play with stuff!

Nice!