Category Archives: Conferences & Presentations

Webcast – Participatory, Continuous, Connected | Top Trends from Library 2.014

Link: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/10/webcasts/participatory-continuous-connected-top-trends-from-library-2-014/

Participatory, hyperlinked library services; DIY and maker movements; emerging technology in academic and research libraries; Google Glass—the Library 2.014 conference covered a broad range of topics and these were among the most notable. Join us for this free LJ webcast, where we’ll cover the highlights of each one and offer key takeaways.

  • Michael Stephens will discuss participatory, hyperlinked library services in a connected world of “continuous computing.”
  • Susan Hildreth will reflect on how the DIY and maker movements—particularly as they relate to STEM education (with badges to certify skill development)—place libraries as central learning hubs for their communities.
  • Samantha Adams Becker taught the first online course ever to take place in Facebook. She will explore emerging technology uptake—especially digital communication formats—in various education sectors including academic and research libraries.
  • Ayyoub Ajmi will describe experiences using Google Glass at the UMKC School of Law Library—what they did with it, what they couldn’t do, and what’s for the future.

Join Michael Stephens who will moderate a lively and insightful discussion with our panel of distinguished experts.

Panelists:

Ayyoub Ajmi, Digital Communications & Learning Initiatives Librarian, University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC)

Samantha Adams Becker, Senior Director of Communications, New Media Consortium

Susan Hildreth, Director, Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)

Moderator:

Michael Stephens, Assistant Professor and monthly columnist for Library Journal

register button Participatory, Continuous, Connected | Top Trends from Library 2.014Can’t make it October 30th? No problem! Register now and you will receive an email from Library Journal with the URL to access the archive for this event.

Internet Librarian International is Coming Up!

Shout out to all the fine folks organizing and attending my favorite conference – Internet Librarian International – in London in just 3 weeks. I am so sorry I cannot be there this year!

Folks come from all over the world for this conference and I have always come away inspired and energized.

Here’s a sampling of what delegates will experience:

How are library and information services evolving?
This is what ILI is all about! Technology, content and the methods for delivering it, plus evolving new services and models, all influence our ability to provide the best possible experience for our users. Hear this year’s trends in library tech – including 3D printers, the latest in digital learning materials, apps, the future of documents, library labs and more – plus meaningful social media, marketing and measuring impact, altmetrics, and how search and discovery tools and techniques are revolutionising the library experience.

Which new technologies and business models are the most appropriate for us to pursue now – and where should we focus our attention next?
All three tracks on Day One of ILI – New Blueprints for Libraries, Technology Innovation & Impact, and Content Innovation – are dedicated to technology and service trends and how to harness them now for future gain. Learn from practitioners who have redesigned their services to become key influencers in their organisations; how to create and curate innovative new content; get up to speed on real-world tech and how technology partnerships are driving change; and understand how gaming is building user experiences and encouraging social sharing.

What changes can we make to ensure our organisations and communities thrive?
ILI’s Day Two track, Closer to Communities and Customers, sets out the latest techniques for engaging new audiences, as well as models for developing your communities through co-creation and cooperation programmes. You’ll hear from experts in a range of library environments, each practising what they preach by listening to users and other key stakeholders, and developing services based on their needs.

What new models and roles have emerged to meet the changing demands of end-users?
New Blueprints for Libraries
 comprises a host of discussions on new and innovative models for libraries and librarians. Learn how radical, emerging new roles – from DJ to UX specialist – are inspiring change, plus a look at how libraries from different countries and cultures are responding to the same core issues to transform their communities.

How are libraries – and librarians – changing to ensure they are future-ready?
As information professionals, we’re not unique in our need to constantly evolve our services and roles, but we are fortunate that ILI brings together so many pioneers of library services from all over the world to show us what works, and what doesn’t! We know our libraries must grow with our users, and ILI’s track Closer to Communities and Customers provides plenty of insight into how to engage with existing audiences, and reach new ones too. If you are currently redesigning your services, then ILI’s New Blueprint for Libraries track helps you benefit from the experiences of global library leaders already exploiting multifunctional potential; while the Technology Innovation & Impact track guides you through technology that is going to make a big difference to us all in the future, and how we plan for its implementation and uptake.

#IFLALimerick Thanks IFLA Information Literacy Conference!

Thanks to everyone at the Information Literacy Section Satellite Meeting hosted by Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Republic of Ireland. I have thoroughly enjoyed the sessions and the conversations!

http://iflasatellitelimerick.com

Here are the slides from my keynote talk this morning:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensLearningEverywhereIFLAInfoLIT.pdf

Now it’s on to Lyon!

ILI’s Keynote Speakers

Internet Librarian International will take place in October in London.

2014 Theme – Positive Change: Creating Real Impact

  • UNDERSTAND the changes you can make to ensure your communities thrive
  • LEARN about emerging models and roles that meet the changing demands of end-users
  • HEAR how libraries – and librarians – must change to be future ready
  • TAKE HOME new skills and ideas for transformative new services to impact positively on your organisation

The Dark Matter of the Internet
Michael Edson, 
Smithsonian Institution; Open Knowledge Foundation; Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), USA

According to Michael, history is defined by periods in which we thought we had a pretty good idea of what was going on, punctuated by brief moments when we realised we really didn’t have a clue – we’re going through one of those moments right now, and it’s all wrapped up with the internet and scale. Like dark matter, the internet has a force, a mass, and a capability that is often unseen or undetected. For today’s organisations, success comes down to how well we harness the dark matter of the internet and the collaborative, social, peer-to-peer and read/write opportunities it presents. Join us to hear Michael’s thoughts on how the internet’s dark matter is the future of our libraries and information environments.

Digital Inclusion – The Big Mission
Rachel NeamanGo ON UK


Rachel Neaman is the newly-appointed CEO of Go ON UK, the digital inclusion charity. Prior to joining Go ON UK, Rachel worked at the UK’s Department of Health, where she was responsible for developing digital strategy, policy and guidance on transforming public services, as well as on assisted digital and digital inclusion. In this keynote, Rachel will explore how digital skills are empowering people, businesses and countries and describes a roadmap to digital inclusion and prosperity which will have resonance for information professional from all sectors.

Founded and Chaired by Baroness Lane-Fox, Go ON UK is the UK’s Digital Skills Alliance, dedicated to inspiring and supporting people and organisations that want to share their digital skills with others.

Further information about Internet Librarian International can be seen at: www.internet-librarian.com

 

IFLA Information Literacy Satellite Meeting: The Hyperlinked Library: Everywhere and Anytime Learning Spaces

Note: This is the abstract for my keynote at the IFLA Information Literacy Satellite Meeting in Limerick, Ireland the week before IFLA in Lyon.

http://www.iflasatellitelimerick.com/page/15/keynote-speakers/

The Hyperlinked Library: Everywhere and Anytime Learning Spaces

Emerging mechanisms for global communication and collaboration are changing the world and the way the world learns and interacts. Individuals are constantly engaged in conversation and expect to have their information needs satisfied immediately, on any device, and wherever they happen to be. Learning via mobile devices happens in an entirely new landscape, infinite in every direction. Information is no longer bound to a form, and access to information through mobile devices has unbundled learning from traditional delivery systems restricted by time and space. It has made anytime, anywhere collaboration and feedback possible. It has fostered impromptu conversations without concerns for language and cultural differences. Knowledge networks form and expand that can directly connect all levels of participants, from beginning learners to experts. These virtual exchange spaces can offer endless opportunities for future-thinking librarians, who use self directed learning opportunities to develop skills as online experience curators and engagement developers.

In A New Culture of Learning, authors Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown write, “Where imaginations play, learning happens.” This should define library services for now and in the future. Intelligence, user-sensitive planning, and insights from research will guide the creation and implementation of physical and virtual library spaces that function as creative and playful environments. Online, multi-scale platforms aimed at social learning and participation will spark new conversations that spread deep within library culture and extend out into disciplines that have historically made few connections with physical library collections or librarians.

Many professionals and members of the public will never have the opportunity to visit particular libraries and will never happen upon most library websites. Libraries housing unique and valuable collections, works and artifacts of local significance, and information sources not yet digitized must find ways to reach out to a world of learners who depend upon the curators and caretakers of inspiring works to initiate contact with the public through outreach, advertising, and social sharing. Libraries that are already providing online services and digital materials must constantly watch for innovative solutions that could be included in their information center processes, designs, and Web presences.

There are disproportions in comfort, experience, and ability with technologies, and all types of libraries should offer online learning programs that aim at enhancing the public’s digital literacies. Self-directed learning activities fashioned on the Learning 2.0 model, teach the concepts and skills necessary to use emerging communications technologies. Citizens who are unable to access opportunities to enhance digital literacy lose the ability to prosper in our hyper-connected world. The authors of an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) report entitled Building Digital Communities define digital literacy as the ability to “access and use information and communication technologies.” I might call digital literacy “life literacy.” Without access to these skills, the report states, “full participation in nearly every aspect of American society—from economic success and educational achievement, to positive health outcomes and civic engagement—is compromised.” Lifelong learning goes hand in hand with life literacy.

LIbrarians must experiment with new roles in these virtual, expansive spaces where learning is a continuous conversation. Practices of exploration, participation, and play can turn the gathering and use of information into sequences of discovery that foster innovation and invention. The Hyperlinked Library model offers a design framework for constructing experiences that will combine the tenets and skill sets of librarianship with the explosion of open, participatory knowledge construction made possible because of new technologies and the information professionals who experiment with, master, and teach these technologies.

References

Becker, S., Coward, C. Carandall, M., Sears, R., Carlee, R., Hasbargen, K., & Ball, M. A. (2012). Building digital communities: A framework for action. Washington, DC: Institute of Museum and Library Services. Retrieved from http://www.imls.gov/assets/1/AssetManager/BuildingDigitalCommunities_Framework.pdf

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

See You in Tampa!

Expert Series – Mobile and Web Technologies

Date/Time
Date(s) – 07/21/2014
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Mobile and Web technologies are creating a world of everywhere and anytime learning opportunities, and libraries can play a key role in this future. Imagine the emerging hyperlinked library as an active creation space, magnetic community space, new tools and resources space— a practical anything space. Imagine this library available everywhere and at anytime via mobile devices and tablets. How will services change? What training, skills, and support will staff require? What does this future look like going forward as we encourage “edgeless” learning as a means for transformative change for ourselves and for our users?

Michael Stephens, Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University, will explore the culture of “Learning Always” and the emerging models of connected, open, and free instructional environments that offer great potential for staff and the public. Can we support students of all kinds in Massive Open Online Courses? Can we create spaces in our institutions for discovery, play and knowledge creation? What’s the potential for professional development and lifelong learning when courses can be designed to present the latest from the best of the best in every discipline and offer experiences and exploration anywhere and anytime? This session will explore the creative ideas and thinking behind the momentum toward learning everywhere, and how our libraries can be at the forefront for supporting and taking advantage of this new learning culture.

Biography ~ Michael Stephens
Dr. Michael Stephens is Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University. He was the 2009 CAVAL Visiting Scholar in Australia, consulted and presented for US Embassies in Germany, Switzerland, and Turkey, and presents to both national and international audiences about emerging technologies, learning, innovation, and libraries. Since 2010, Dr. Stephens has written the monthly column “Office Hours” for Library Journal exploring the issues, ideas, and emerging trends in library and information science education.  To review Dr. Stephen’s archive of work, visit his Tame the Web website and blog http://tametheweb.com.

Embassy Suites Hotel – Brandon Meeting Room