Category Archives: Internet Librarian International

Danny Sullivan’s Keynote on Searching : An ILI Congrunt

Danny Sullivan
Web Search: A Look Ahead

It’s no longer Google Google Google

Consolidation of Search Engines means a strong “search voice” – good for searchers

What will help an engine win the search wars?

Sullivan says it will be personalization and “invisible tabs” may be the way to win.

For example, entering “pictures of cats” in the search box yields pictures of cats in Yahoo and Ask Jeeves. Google offers a small link: “Looking for pictures? Try Images.” Sullivan likened this to the search engine acting as a librarian by interacting with the searcher.

Search shortcuts also create sticky situations. Some folks get in a habit and always go to a certain site for a certain thing: “I always check the weather in Yahoo”

Personalization – like Eurekster – may work as well and may be pointing toward the future of personalized web search. Search memory on sites like A9 or Yahoo keeps track of the searches you’ve done.

Take a look at http://labs.google.com/personalized and http://www.snap.com/index.php

User Interface “Little Things”

Visual Searching (Grokker and Mooter)
Clustering
Yahoo offering RSS

Meeting Another Trainer

I posted the Stonehenge pics this weekend and I got a note from Rob Coers, an Internet trainer I’ve e-mailed with in the past besed in the Netherlands. He had just checked his RSS aggregator and saw my posts and realized I was in England for the conference and he was coming too!

Rob e-mailed me and said he’d look for me at the conference. We met and got to spend some time talking about training public librarians. He worked in a public library and then went out on his own to do training for librarians. How cool!

We went to dinner Monday night and discussed libraries, training librarians, blogs, RSS and the differences in our cultures.

Nice to meet you Rob!

Conference Report: Workshop

I taught the half day workshop that Scott Brandt and I developed on Sunday morning for a small but most cool group of folks from Finland, South Africa, Japan and Greece!

We focused on 5 steps to make sure technology training works. The best part was the interaction with the group — from questions to “this is how I do it” tales from particpants.

Greetings from Stonehenge!

DSC02167_1.jpg

We arrived at 11am Thursday morning after a most pleasnat trip over the Atlantic… why? because we upgraded to Business Class and could actually stretch out! Nice!

Friday was spent touring the Salisbury plain and Stonhenge…which was one of the places on my list of notable sites to see in my lifetime!

Now it’s Saturday night– today we visited the British Museum. I just saw some cool InfoToday folks in the lobby so things are about to start. I’m at Starbucks, connected to T-Mobile for a bit…

Here’s the Stonehenge Gallery!

ILI Sessions

Here’s a breakdown of sessions I’m involved in:

Workshop 2: Successful Technology Training
10:00 ? 13:00
Michael Stephens, St. Joseph County Public Library (USA)

This energetic, fast-paced workshop teaches how to plan and implement successful technology training that is centered on the user and defined by user needs. Delegates will learn three methods to analyse and define users? technology needs, a ?sure fire? test to ensure measurable outcomes and objectives,
simplified task analysis for breaking learning down into steps, a toolbox of strategies to make technology learning fun and interesting, and two approaches to demonstrate and reinforce learning. With theory made practical, demonstrations of real world training and instruction, and in-class practice using these techniques, this workshop is fun and highly interactive.

Tuesday, 12 October
Track B ? Optimising Technology in Libraries [Chalford/Dean Suite]
Moderator: Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology, Northwestern University (USA)

This track is a special 2-hour session featuring three technology gurus talking about how to plan for and put new technologies to work in your libraries. Listen in on their high energy wavelength as they wrap up with a stimulating panel discussion that challenges librarians to expand their horizons and take on new technology projects.

Sessions B201 & B202
Optimising Technology in Libraries
10:30-12:30

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Libraries, Blogs & RSS
Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology, Northwestern University (USA)

Weblogs (blogs) are one of the hottest things on the web today, but what relevance do they have to libraries? A lot, according to Frank Cervone. Weblogs can help you learn about developments in any field, but they can also be used to reach out to patrons in new and exciting ways. Listen and learn how
new technologies, such as RSS, are used to provide new, exciting services and how they are being deployed in libraries today. You will also learn what blogs are, about blogging software, and how blogs can be used to provide more effective library services.

Beyond E-Mail! Wikis, Blogs and Social Networking Software
Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus, UKOLN (UK)

We know about using the web for publishing, but several recent innovations offer richer and more interactive ways to support communications and collaboration. For young people, communications tools such as instant messaging and mobile phone technologies are widely used and even replacing e-mail. Brian Kelly will discuss new collaborative technologies, such as wikis and blogs, and the emergence of social networking software. He will describe challenges and strategies for deploying these intriguing, new collaborative tools and show examples of how they are being used in libraries today.

Technology Planning for Libraries: Avoiding Technolust & Technobust
Michael Stephens, Technology Librarian, St. Joseph County Public Library (USA)

Deploying new technologies requires effective technology planning. How do we serve our users with innovative technology and still remain within our budgets? Michael Stephens discusses current hot technologies such as RFID, wifi, MP3s, DRM, federated searching and how they might fit into library technology plans. He will cover what to consider when planning new technology initiatives, including: cost, training, ROI, staffing, etc. Technolust (defined as wanting technology for the sake of technology) is a frequent pitfall for technology enthusiasts. Learn how to create a well-written technology plan that serves as a guide to help you avoid technobust!

Optimising Technology in Libraries (Panel Discussion)
Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology, Northwestern University (USA)
Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus, UKOLN (UK)
Michael Stephens, Technology Librarian, St. Joseph County Public Library (USA)

Join the three speakers in this special session for stimulating discussion of where technology for libraries is headed, which new developments they see as best bets for successful projects, and their tips on strategies, deployment, and technical problems.