Category Archives: Conferences & Presentations

See You In Monterey

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Hope to see you there!

Here’s what I’ll be up to:

Sunday Nov 14th
Workshop 19
Make Learning Stick: Creating 5-Star, User-Centered Training & Instruction

1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library
D. Scott Brandt, Professor & Technology Training Librarian, Purdue University, & Columnist for Computers in Libraries

Once you have assessed and identified user needs, you?re ready to build a lesson plan or course module to guide the learning. This update of the popular workshop, ?Teaching the Internet in 60 Minutes,? is taught by a dynamic duo representing both academic and public library backgrounds. It uses a building-block approach to create effective, user-centered learning that focuses on measurable outcomes. You will learn how to:
? Categorize learning objectives into five categories of performance.
? Ensure learner outcomes can be demonstrated and measured.
? Focus learning into performance steps that are complete and achievable.
? Select teaching strategies that match objectives for fun and interesting learning.
? Apply two methods to demonstrate and reinforce learning.
Illustrating with many examples from successful Internet-related modules taught in both academic and public library settings, speakers show modules on browser and e-mail management, searching, and digital reference. With theory made practical, in-class practice using these techniques, and demonstrations of real-world training/instruction, this workshop is fast-paced and highly interactive! (Can be combined with workshop 13, ?Understanding Your Learners Needs,? for a complete immersion in training and instruction theories and techniques.)

Tuesday Nov. 16
Creating Internet-Savvy Patrons

11:30 a.m. ? 12:15 p.m.
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library
Jamie Wilson, Middle School Librarian, Tower Hill School (DE)

A prerequisite for much of the training and instruction that librarians do starts with patrons who are savvy users, of computers in general and the Internet specifically. Universities and corporations may take it for granted that their students, staff, and employees have gained such experience, but it takes front-line librarians in public and school libraries to ensure skills and knowledge are taught. We?ll hear some tips on dealing with patrons with a wide variety of skills and experience, and how to deal with and respond to student perceptions of the Web.

Get ?Em Started?Teaching Weblogs to Staff
3:15 p.m. ? 4:00 p.m.
Steven M. Cohen, Assistant Librarian, Rivkin Radler, LLP
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library & Blogger for Tame the Web

In order to have Weblogs work in the library environment, be it corporate, academic, or even public, staff need to be trained on how to use the technology so that they can use it to best serve their clients. This session discusses methods and theories on how to best train your staff for the Weblog revolution.

Wednesday Nov. 17
Instant Messaging (IM)

1:15 p.m. ? 2:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Aaron Schmidt, Reference Librarian, Thomas Ford Memorial Library
Michael Stephens, Technology Training and Web Development, St. Joseph County Public Library, & Blogger for Tame the Web
May Chang, Web Development Librarian, NCSU Libraries
Daniel C. Mack, Humanities Librarian, Roberta Astroff, Humanities Librarian, Ashley Robinson, Gateway Librarian & Gary W. White, Head, Shreyer Business Library, Pennsylvania State University

A 2003 survey indicated that nearly 70 percent of the U.S. university Internet population used IM. This session covers research, applications, case studies, usage, workflow impact, and ethics of IM. Schmidt and Stephens look at the many uses of IM, from in-house staff communication, to the delivery of content and discussions with customers. Chang reviews IM developments in consumer grade services and open source applications, issues of security and interoperability, and IM as a productivity tool. She draws on the experience of NCSU Libraries, where an open source IM system was recently deployed for in-house communication. The Penn State team discusses models of ethical behavior for electronic communications available in libraries (IM, e-mail, virtual
reference), their effective use with various populations of library users, and how to maintain high ethical standards in all areas of interpersonal electronic communications.

More will follow…

Oh – and Steven mentioned messaging at the conference. I’m all for it! My AIM name is mstephens7mac!

10 Things I Learned in London at Internet Librarian International

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10 Things I Learned in London at Internet Librarian International

It’s a sweet thing to drink breakfast tea in my room, lounging in my hotel dressing gown, reading the proceedings and planning for the day.

Technology training issues are the same for trainer/librarians everywhere – from issues about retention of material to support for training programs by administrators! Talking with Rob was illuminating and made me realize public librarians in the Netherlands are lucky to have him doing training!

According to Sullivan: personalization and “invisible tabs” may be the wave of the future for search engines…and after hearing Frank Cervone speak, we could say the same for library Web sites! Customization will rule!

FREE WiFi in the meeting rooms and conference areas is the way all library conferences should go!

Brian Kelly gets it! He encouraged folks to message each other with laptops or other devices and discuss our presentations while we were presenting!

Key words: convergence & collaboration! Presenting with Frank cervone and Brian Kelly was a joy! What inceredible fellows! Our panel was rather lively…with Brian playing the skeptic…

Receptions and lunches are the coolest times to chat with people: networking, marketing yourself and your library, exchanging knowledge… and at the reception you get good red wine too!

Even without PPT and notes, I still can mange to say something about technology and its place in libraries.

I’ve said it before, but if you can swing it, if you can afford it, send your librarians to meetings like this! Get them out and get them involved and listening. Time is short – what if the next cool thing comes from a group of librarians and not Google or MS?

No matter where we’re from, we all speak the same language: libraries! In speaking, listening to others, chatting at breaks… it dawned on me: Problems I’ve encountered are the same for folks on the other side of the world. I spoke about surprise technology appearing on reference desks and the nods in the audience meant those folks had encountered it too!

Practicing what I Preach

In my technology training workshop Sunday one of my points was that if you are doing a presentation you have to be ready to roll with any glitches that pop up.

Monday I got to practice what I preach. My CyberClinic was about new technologies in libraries and I created a small PPT to use. I copied it from my Mac to my JumpDrive and was good to go — or so I thought….

In the room…with minutes before the start — an maybe 40 folks waiting — the PPT would not open! It would not open on another laptop as well! My Mac was in my hotel room so I had to go ahead and do it from my own storage drive — my brain!

I had no notes because the PPT was my outline as well…so I did it. I spoke from my head! It went ok!!

Moral: always test your copied presentations when moving them with portable storage drives!!! Test them on the drives!!!

Danny Sullivan’s Keynote on Searching : An ILI Congrunt

Danny Sullivan
Web Search: A Look Ahead

It’s no longer Google Google Google

Consolidation of Search Engines means a strong “search voice” – good for searchers

What will help an engine win the search wars?

Sullivan says it will be personalization and “invisible tabs” may be the way to win.

For example, entering “pictures of cats” in the search box yields pictures of cats in Yahoo and Ask Jeeves. Google offers a small link: “Looking for pictures? Try Images.” Sullivan likened this to the search engine acting as a librarian by interacting with the searcher.

Search shortcuts also create sticky situations. Some folks get in a habit and always go to a certain site for a certain thing: “I always check the weather in Yahoo”

Personalization – like Eurekster – may work as well and may be pointing toward the future of personalized web search. Search memory on sites like A9 or Yahoo keeps track of the searches you’ve done.

Take a look at http://labs.google.com/personalized and http://www.snap.com/index.php

User Interface “Little Things”

Visual Searching (Grokker and Mooter)
Clustering
Yahoo offering RSS