Category Archives: Salzburg Global Seminar 2011 – Participatory Culture

Participatory Culture: Culture & Communities

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Culture and Communities: How can libraries and museums use their many resources and strengths, including their collections, spaces, and people, to reflect cultural and demographic shifts and bridge cultural differences? How do they select the stories they tell and the services and experiences they offer?

Gabriela Aidar, Coordinator of the Social Inclusion Program, Sa?o Paulo State Pinacoteca, Sa?o Paulo, Brazil, opened this discussion by sharing some thoughts about combating social inequalities – how can museums take a stand in this arena? Aidar urged museums to get involved and take action through the development of specific programs and shared a case study designed to promote access to museum objects held at the museum by non museum goers. Programs include outreach to street dwellers, drug addicts, those living in poverty. Training programs for social workers is just one example of the outreach methodology for the museum.

Next up, Mats Widbom, Director, Museum of World Culture, Go?teborg, Sweden, made some intriguing points about museums breaking down barriers to access and creating an inviting atmosphere. Widbom discussed his museum’s programming and touched on reaching out to hybrid cultures. One example: the exciting “invasion” of hundreds of youth for a successful Manga festival at the museum.

Part of the museum’s mission:

The museum wants to be an arena for discussion and reflection in which many and different voices will be heard, where the controversial and conflict-filled topics can be addressed, as well as a place where people can feel at home across borders.

“A place where people can feel at home….” Nice! It was at this point where I realized how similar our goals are in pursuing a sustainable future for libraries and museums. It means engaging Ina level we might not ever have considered before. A level that might even seem scary to some in the profession. One audience member noted these actions are courageous and filled with risks: honestly involving our users, breaking down barriers to our collections and inviting our guests to create and intact with us. Bring it on!

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.


Jenkins on Participatory Culture

It’s good to revisit this definition in light of this week’s work:

“A participatory culture is a culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices.A participatory culture is also one in which members believe their contributions matter, and feel some degree of social con- nection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created).”

From page 3 of Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/files/working/NMLWhitePaper.pdf

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.

The Nature of Participatory Culture

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Our evening session featured discussion and debate on what defines participatory culture. Here are the questions explored from the seminar documents:

The Nature of Participatory Culture: What are the societal changes that are shaping the future of museums and libraries? How do these changes affect and transform their roles in their communities? What are the expectations of their different publics, and how do they create meaningful relationships with them that meet changing needs for knowledge, skills, and information? How do they remove actual or perceived barriers to access and inclusion? What is the definition of “participatory” in this context?

Discussion centered around definitions of participation, and the impact of technology. One key point: has there always been participation in creation and dissemination of knowledge, object and artifacts or is it a result of the new technologies I’ve been writing about here at TTW for a few years?

Greg Hayton, CEO of Cambridge Libraries and Galleries in Canada, shared a story about a library director in Finland moving her office into the public area in a stage-like setting to be more visible to the staff and the public. “Enlightening,” Greg said. I would agree. It takes a certain type of administrator to be that transparent.

Dawn Casey, director of the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, gave a short talk exploring the nature of participation at her institution. Sharing stories about installations and public programs, Dawn’s remarks bright to mind how important inclusion, transparency can be to administration of institutions. “It’s not just about using digital media, it’s about engaging with everyone: staff, visitors, school children – everyone,” Dawn said.

One very interesting theme that rose to the top was the concept of institutional attitudes toward participation and technology. This is where it becomes more about people and less aout technology or even the institution. The discussion was as diverse as the assembled group, with museum folk taking the lead on the discourse. I would have liked to hear more from my colleagues in libraries as the points played out. There will more time for that over the next three days.

Serhan Ada, head of the Cultural Management Program of Istanbul Biligi University, summed it up the discussion well in a final comment: “Participation occurs when someone welcomed as a guest feels as though they have become a host.”

 

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.


Participatory Culture and Teens

Teen Librarianship has a unique place within libraries.  It’s not quite a new idea for libraries to provide dedicated services to teens, yet it doesn’t still have the same kind of rich history we have with other populations.  This gives teen librarianship a unique place within libraries today; it allows the librarians that serve these groups the chance to experiment in regards to how we approach library services.  Teen librarians are not exactly bound by the same rules and programs which have held public libraries together for many years.  Librarians working with teens have the chance to fully embrace participatory culture and help build a community of patrons who participate just as much as they consume.
THE LIBRARY STAFF IS THE COLLECTION
Librarians can act as the teachers for guiding their community towards being more active in sharing.  This is one of the ways libraries in the 21st century can show their public value to their communities.  The role of the librarian is transformed when librarians help their communities create content instead of merely just consuming it.  We become teachers for our community, guides who help patrons learn and experience in new ways.  This also adds value to the library staff.  No longer are library staff just “there to help”, but they are there to help you experience.  This added value re purposes libraries; the staff has become as important as the collection.  Much like the reference book that helps you repair your car, the staff and their unique skills can help patrons navigate the 21st century.

LET’S BUILD SOMETHING
The use of technology has changed the way our community members can communicate with other.  Patrons are no longer restricted by geography, forms of communication, or channels to publish their communication.  Libraries now have a vast array of tools in our utility belt that we can call upon to engage patrons, build unique collections, and more.  For example, take Historypin, which allows users to upload photos and pin them to a Google Map.  With photos added, the true power of Historypin becomes clearer, as it creates a visual map of your community.  The best part about it?  It’s free to anyone that wants to contribute and share.  Our communities now assist in building collections, and librarians become the curators of those collections.  Better yet?  Teen are learning new ways of communication which will no doubt aid them in their own search for identity but also give back to the complex fabric of the community in which they live.

(check out this and this for examples on teens creating unique content for their local public libraries)
This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.

 

-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor

Join the Conversation Libraries & Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture

There are a few ways to add your voice:

Twitter: #SGSculture

@salzburgglobal

Follow posts at these blogs:

IMLS Up Next Blog: http://blog.imls.gov/

IMAMuseum Blog: http://www.imamuseum.org/blog/

Seminar: http://www.salzburgglobal.org/current/Sessions.cfm?IDSPECIAL_EVENT=2961

This TTW category gathers posts from the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.

Exploring the Museum Side

Joining me as a blogger for the Salzburg Global Seminar focused on participatory culture and libraries and museums is Robert Stein from the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Here is a post he did last week in preparation for the seminar:

http://www.imamuseum.org/blog/2011/10/11/please-chime-in-the-challenges-and-opportunities-of-participatory-culture/

Robert tweets @rjstein

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.

Beginning the Seminar

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We’re starting our session with introductions from the organizers, facilitators and the group. Representing libraries and museums from all over the world, the group is diverse and made up of fascinating folks. Find out more here:

http://www.salzburgglobal.org/current/sessions.cfm?IDSpecial_Event=2961

 

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar  and IMLS for the invitation to participate in this event.

 

 

Extending a Global Conversation about Museums and Libraries in Salzburg

Greetings from Salzburg and the Salzburg Global Seminar.

I am honored to be here this week to participate as well as share the work of the group coming together to explore what participatory culture means for libraries and museums.

My focus for a panel presentation to launch a discussion about the topics is Communication & Technology.

Here are some of the questions we will explore: How are new technology innovations changing the ways people communicate? How can the participatory nature of the new technologies enhance the way libraries and museums and their users interact and connect? What implications do online social media platforms and the extensive use of digital technology and images by libraries and museums hold for the collections, physical spaces, and architecture of these institutions?

My thoughts for a brief presentation as part of a panel on Friday:

Emerging technologies have the potential to enhance the relationships between organizations and users. Museums, libraries, information centers have a great opportunity to make connections around collections and conversations. I see four thematic areas for these emerging trends and the technologies that enable them:

•Mobile & Geo-Social Information Environments
•The Commons & Digital Curation
•Participatory Library Service & User Experience
•Learning & New Literacies

What challenges do you see for libraries and museums? What opportunities do we have?

I’ll be blogging from the seminar this week as well as tweeting, etc.

Don’t miss coverage at the IMLS Blog as well: http://blog.imls.gov/?p=542

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar for the invitation to participate in this event.

Next Week: Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture – Salzburg Global Institute

Next week I’ll be taking part in the Salzburg Global Institute program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture:

http://www.salzburgglobal.org/current/sessions.cfm?IDSpecial_Event=2961

As key stewards of our culture and heritage, libraries and museums have traditionally enjoyed, and to a great extent still do enjoy, a unique role and special responsibility within societies around the world. But as economic disruptions and rapid technological innovation have brought about dramatic societal changes, libraries and museums, too, are being forced to revisit and rethink their own roles and responsibilities within these changing societies. The 21st century indeed poses perplexing challenges, but at the same time offers intriguing new opportunities for libraries and museums. It is a critical moment for leaders within libraries and museums to reflect creatively and strategically about the role and place of their institutions in an era of participatory culture and to recognize and seize the opportunity for reorientation and reinvention.

One of my roles will be that of blogger for the sessions and discussions. I will be posting here at TTW often throughout the four day institute. I’ll also be taking part in a panel discussion on emerging technologies and participatory culture.

I’ve been teaching Participatory Service in Libraries for a few years now – utilizing Michael Casey & Laura Savastinuk’s Library 2.0: A guide to participatory library service  as well as other excellent resources and it amazes me to see how many of the ideas and philosophies of participatory service are integrated into libraries. To prepare for next week,  I thought I’d ask TTW readers to share their thoughts about participatory culture and libraries in 2011. Please comment below – or consider submitting a guest post to TTW – I’ll review any submission folks might send for possible publication at TTW  (excluding those weird spammy emails I get from time to time from 100 great online whatevers). Email me at mstephens7 (at) mac.com

Thanks to the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington, D.C. and the Salzburg Global Seminar for inviting me to participate in this event.

This post is a reflection/response to questions posed at the Salzburg Global Seminar program Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture, exploring the challenges, solutions and potential for participatory services within libraries and museums.

Special Thanks to the Salzburg Global Seminar for the invitation to participate in this event.

London Calls Again! Announcing ILI2007

ILI 2007

http://www.internet-librarian.com/CallForSpeakers.shtml

The Call for Speakers is out for Internet Librarian International, October 8-9, 2007 in London, England! I have attended, spoken at this conference, and worked on the advisory committee the past few years. This is one heck of a fun and informative meeting. Consider submitting a proposal.

Take a look at some Flickr shots from last year: http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelsphotos/tags/ili2006/