Category Archives: #hyperlibMOOC

#hyperlibMOOC: Community Profile of Margaret Jean Campbell

Margaret is my super cool research assistant.

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/community-profile/margaret-jean-campbell

Student Margaret Jean Campbell bubbles with enthusiasm when talking about how she helped develop the first massive open online course, or MOOC, at the San José State University School of Library and Information Science.

The Hyperlinked Library MOOC (#hyperlibMOOC on Twitter), which started on September 3, is taught by Assistant Professor Michael Stephens and Lecturer Kyle Jones. It parallels much of the content in Stephens’ LIBR 287: Hyperlinked Library course, offered to students enrolled in the school’s Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program. Intended for professional development, the MOOC is offered free to the public. MOOC students can earn a certificate of completion at the end of the course, but no college credit.

Campbell took Stephens’ Hyperlinked Library course in spring 2013, and quickly decided to apply for a student assistant position, helping develop the MOOC.

“What I experienced was a rush of connectivity and interaction in learning,” said Campbell, describing her involvement developing the MOOC. “And that connection was facilitated by technology.”

Campbell’s role as a member of the MOOC development team involved finding and adding course content, organizing the course website, and communicating with MOOC students.

What attracted Campbell to the project was the fact that it’s based on research and evidence of success with similar MOOCs, while offering the opportunity to extend this research by creating a new professional development opportunity that’s facilitated by technology. She feels that the information school’s MOOC design is highly sophisticated in terms of its interconnectivity and social engagement.

read the whole profile here: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/community-profile/margaret-jean-campbell

#hyperlibMOOC Update:Your upcoming SJSU SLIS MOOC Experience!

We’re gearing up for the Fall 2013 Hyperlinked Library MOOC Pilot, and we are excited to share the most recent news.

Here are some of the topics and guest lecturers that we have planned for our MOOC participants:

• Explore the Hyperlinked Library Model, Hyperlinked Library Communities, and Community Engagement, along with Participatory Service and Planning for Hyperlinked Libraries. We’ve invited Michael Casey, Sarah Ludwig, Monica Harris, Gretchen Caserroti, and others as guest lecturers and have open and collaborative assignments for you to explore.

• Expand understandings about Transparency, Privacy, User Experience, and the Mobile and Geo-Social Environments. We’ve invited Aaron Schmidt and Jan Holmquist as guest lecturers, and have organized an expansive and open set of resources for you to use and share.

• Engage with The Creation Culture, Learning and New Literacies, and Reflective Practice. We’ve invited Nate Hill, Char Booth, and Peter Morville as guest lecturers, and we will be adding more lecturers, content, and online experiences for you in the coming weeks.

We cannot wait to begin sharing this global, completely open and free, online learning opportunity with you.

 

#hyperlibMOOC: Please Suggest More Books for the Reading List!

Greetings! The Hyperlinked Library MOOC is coming together. Kyle Jones and his team of SJSU SLIS students are building an incredible site for the MOOC and for our SLIS classes.

I wanted to put out a call – as i have done before – for additions to the “Context Book” assignment. We’ll use this in the MOOC and in our regular SLIS class. What socio-technical titles would you add to this list?

 

 

  • Anderson, Chris. The Long Tail
  • Anderson, Chris. Makers: The New Industrial Revolution
  • Batelle, John. The Search
  • Beck, John C. & Mitchell Wade. Got game
  • Berger, Jonah. Contagious: Why Things Catch On
  • Bernoff, Josh. Groundswell
  • Bilton, Nick. I Live in the Future And Here’s How It Works: Why Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted
  • Buckingham, David (ed.). Youth,Identity,and Digital Media
  • Carr, Nicholas. The Big Switch: rewiring the World, from Edison to Google
  • Carr, Nicholas. The Shallows
  • Collins, Jim. Good to Great
  • Davidson, Cathy. Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn
  • Doctorow, Cory. Content
  • Duhigg, Charles. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • Dyer, Jeff, Hal Gregersen, Clayton M. Christensen. The Innovator’s DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators.
  • Fields, Jonathan. Uncertainty: Turning Fear and Doubt into Fuel for Brilliance
  • Frankel, Alex. Punching In
  • Friedman, Thomas. The World is Flat
  • Gee, James Paul. What Video Games Have to teach Us about Learning & Literacy
  • Gilmore, James & B. Joseph Pine II. Authenticity
  • Gladwell, Malcolm. Blink
  • Gleick, James. The Information
  • Godin, Seth. Small is the New Big
  • Godin, Seth. Tribes
  • Godin, Seth. Linchpin
  • Godin, Seth. Poke the Box: When Was the Last Time You Did Something for the First Time?
  • Harper, Richard. Texture: Human Expression in the Age of Communications Overload
  • Hayes, Tom. Jump Point:How Network Culture is Revolutionizing Business
  • Hsieh, Tony. Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion and Purpose
  • Ito, Mizuko (ed.). Hanging Out,Messing Around,and Geeking Out:Kids Living and Learning with New Media.
  • Jenkins, Henry. Convergence Culture
  • Jenkins, Henry. Fans, Bloggers & Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture
  • Johnson, Clay. The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption
  • Johnson, Marilyn. This Book is Overdue!:How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All
  • Johnson, Steven. Everything Bad is Good for You
  • Johnson, Steven. Future Perfect: The Case For Progress In A Networked Age
  • Johnson, Steven. Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
  • Kawasaki, Guy.  Enchantment:  The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions
  • Kelley, Tom with Jonathan Littman. The Ten Faces of Innovation
  • Kleinberg, Tamara. Think Sideways: A Game-Changing Playbook for Disruptive Thinking.
  • Kusek, David & Gerd Leonhard. The Future of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Revolution.
  • Lanier, Jaron. You are Not a Gadget
  • Levine, Rick et al. The Cluetrain Manifesto
  • Levy, Steven. The Perfect Thing
  • Linkner, Josh.  Disciplined Dreaming: A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity
  • Logan, Dave, John King, and  Hallee Fischer-Wright. Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization
  • MacKinnon, Rebecca. Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle For Internet Freedom
  • Martin, Patricia. Ren Gen Renaissance Generation
  • McGonigal, Jane. Reality is Broken
  • McKnight, John and Peter Block. The Abundant CommunityAwakening the Power of Families and Neighborhoods.
  • Meyer, Danny. Setting the Table
  • Neumeier, Marty. The Designful Company
  • Palfrey, John & Urs Gasser. Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives
  • Penn, Mark J. Microtrends
  • Pink, Daniel. A Whole New Mind
  • Pink, Daniel. Drive
  • Powers, William. Hamlet’s BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age
  • Reynolds, Glenn. An Army of Davids
  • Rheingold, Howard. Smart Mobs
  • Rosenbaum, Steven. Curation Nation : How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators
  • Rushkoff, Douglas. Playing the Future
  • Scoble, Robert & Shel Israel. Naked Conversations
  • Senge, Peter. The Necessary Revolution
  • Shirky, Clay. Here Comes Everybody
  • Shirky, Clay. Cognitive Surplus
  • Simon, Nina. The Participatory Museum

  • Solove, Daniel. The Future of Reputation
  • Sunstein, Cass. Infotopia
  • Tapscot, Dan. Grown Up Digital
  • Tapscott, Don & Anthony D. Williams. Wikinomics
  • Turner, Fred. From Counterculture to Cyberculture
  • Weinberger, David. Everything is Miscellaneous
  • Weinberger, David. Small Pieces Loosely Joined
  • Weinberger, David. Too Big to Know
  • Zittrain, Jonathan. The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It

CIRI: MOOC Meets Learning 2.0

This post was originally published at the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI)  blog at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science in May 2013.

Please add our blog to your reader for ongoing articles on research and innovation from the SLIS faculty: http://slisapps.sjsu.edu/blogs/wp/ciri/

MOOC Meets Learning 2.0 

In Fall 2013, the SJSU School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will be offering its first open online course, the Hyperlinked Library MOOC. It is adapted from an existing online graduate course offered to SJSU students enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program, and is intended to serve as a professional development opportunity for librarians, library staff, and professionals who work in archives and other types of information centers. The SLIS MOOC will be free and will not be offered for academic credit.  It will run from September to November, and will explore how libraries are using emerging technologies to serve their communities. I will be co-teaching with SLIS Lecturer Kyle Jones, along with course assistants, who will be SLIS graduate students.  The MOOC will run on the open-source blogging platform WordPress enhanced with a suite of plug-ins called BuddyPress.

Up to 400 MOOC students will have the opportunity to explore the Hyperlinked Library model through recorded presentations and other content, as well as practical assignments that encourage students to apply what they are learning. Badges will be awarded as students move through the course, culminating with a certificate of completion.

Although educators and scholars are debating the advantages and downsides of MOOCs, with many asserting that MOOCs have the potential to provide new insight regarding online learning, research regarding MOOCs is in its infancy.  A recent study by The Chronicle of Higher Education found that 79% of MOOC instructors believe MOOCs are “worth the hype” (Kolowich, 2013). John Daniel’s 2012 paper Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility explores emerging issues that educators should consider and scholars should research: technology platforms, for-profit versus nonprofit models, effective pedagogy, and student success within large learning environments. A scan of recent research includes assessing the experiences of students and professors in MOOC environments, and evaluating various MOOC platforms and their impact on student learning. Clearly, evaluating MOOC environments is an area ripe for exploration.

The parallels between the MOOC movement and 23 Things/ Learning 2.0 programs, my research area for the past few years, are intriguing. Might we argue that Learning 2.0 (L2.0) programs, offered in hundreds if not thousands of organizations, are precursors to the evolving, open and large scale learning landscape we’re experiencing now?

The #hyperlib MOOC will incorporate certain emphases culled from my L2.0 research. The L2.0 model has an emphasis on play, experimentation and social interaction with other learners as part of the program. A focus on play, innovation and experimentation is needed for 21st century learning success, argue Thomas and Brown in a New Culture of Learning. Jenkins defined play as “the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving,” and argued that play is one of the most important emerging social literacies and valued skills for the changing landscape of education. The L2.0 model combines play and opportunities to explore new technologies into a unique self-directed yet social learning experience.

The MOOC will also based on the concepts of “connected learning,” a term used by Jenkins (2012) to describe participatory online learning with a real-world focus: “It’s social. It’s hands-on. It’s active. It’s networked. It’s personal. It’s effective. Through a new vision of learning, it holds out the possibility for productive and broad-based educational change.”

Research centered on delivering the #hyperlib MOOC will contribute to a better understanding regarding how not-for-credit MOOCs can serve as professional development tools.  I am eager to evaluate the SLIS MOOC, identify areas where the model is effective, and provide recommendations regarding how to improve the design of MOOCs in the future.

References

Daniel, J. (2012). Making sense of MOOCs: Musings in a maze of myth, paradox and possibility.

Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JIME). Retrieved from http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/view/2012-18

Jenkins, H. (March 1, 2012). Connected learning: A new paradigm [Web log post].    http://henryjenkins.org/2012/03/connected_learning_a_new_parad.html

Kolowich, S. (2013, March 18). The minds behind the MOOCs.  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/The-Professors-Behind-the-MOOC/137905/?cid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en#id=overview

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Lexington, Ky: CreateSpace?.

 

SJSU SLIS CIRI: New Post – MOOC Meets Learning 2.0

I have a new post up at the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI)  blog at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science:

http://slisapps.sjsu.edu/blogs/wp/ciri/2013/05/11/mooc-meets-learning-2-0-by-dr-michael-stephens/

Although educators and scholars are debating the advantages and downsides of MOOCs, with many asserting that MOOCs have the potential to provide new insight regarding online learning, research regarding MOOCs is in its infancy.  A recent study by The Chronicle of Higher Education found that 79% of MOOC instructors believe MOOCs are “worth the hype” (Kolowich, 2013). John Daniel’s 2012 paper Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility explores emerging issues that educators should consider and scholars should research: technology platforms, for-profit versus nonprofit models, effective pedagogy, and student success within large learning environments. A scan of recent research includes assessing the experiences of students and professors in MOOC environments, and evaluating various MOOC platforms and their impact on student learning. Clearly, evaluating MOOC environments is an area ripe for exploration.

The parallels between the MOOC movement and 23 Things/ Learning 2.0 programs, my research area for the past few years, are intriguing. Might we argue that Learning 2.0 (L2.0) programs, offered in hundreds if not thousands of organizations, are precursors to the evolving, open and large scale learning landscape we’re experiencing now?

Read the whole post at CIRI!

News: The Hyperlinked Library MOOC Fall 2013 Announced

hyperlibMOOCNote from Michael: I am very excited about this project! We’ll be offering a professional development opportunity for FREE to a global audience AND I’ll be co-teaching with Kyle Jones! Thanks to SJSU SLIS for the incredible support and encouragement for this endeavor!

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/about-slis/news/detail/free-online-course-extends-learning-individuals-across-globe

In an effort to share insight regarding some of the latest trends in the information profession with individuals from across the globe, the San José State University School of Library and Information Science (SJSU SLIS) will be offering a massive open online course (MOOC) in the fall.

The open online course will bring individuals from diverse backgrounds and geographic regions together in an interactive online learning environment. SJSU SLIS award-winning instructors will spearhead this professional development opportunity. The MOOC is available to the public for free, and anyone can register. MOOC students will not receive college credit.

The information school’s first open online course, the Hyperlinked Library MOOC, will begin September 3, 2013, and it explores how libraries are using emerging technologies to serve their communities.

The MOOC parallels content offered in a Hyperlinked Library Seminar taught by assistant professor Dr. Michael Stephens in the fully online Master of Library and Information Science(MLIS) program and fully online Post-Master’s Certificate program at the San José State University School of Library and Information Science. Stephens and SJSU SLIS lecturer Kyle Jones, along with course assistants, will be the instructors for the Hyperlinked Library MOOC.

Stephens has spoken about emerging technologies, innovation, and libraries to audiences in more than 27 states and eight countries, including a research tour of Australia and presentations for the U.S. embassies in Germany and Turkey. He has authored numerous articles, and he currently writes the monthly column “Office Hours” in Library Journal magazine, exploring issues, ideas and emerging trends in library and information science education.

Jones is a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and teaches on topics related to digital tools, trends, and controversies. He is the author of several publications, including a book chapter in “The LIS Professional Commons and the Online Networked Practitioner” with Stephens.

The term “Hyperlinked Library” describes how our connected world is transforming 21stCentury libraries into participatory, playful, and user-centered spaces while upholding traditional values. It encompasses both physical and virtual space, as well as many types of libraries.

For example, during the 2009 Australian School Library Association conference in Perth, Stephens presented the Hyperlinked Library model to teacher librarians. “School librarians could use the model to extend support for learning beyond the walls of the school library and engage with students, teachers and administrators in an open, transparent manner wherever the learning takes place,” wrote Stephens in his Hyperlinked Library TTW whitepaper.

He further explained, “Hyperlinked library services are born from careful trend-spotting, an application of the foundational tenets of librarianship and an informed understanding of emerging technologies? societal and cultural impact.”

More information about the Hyperlinked Library:

MOOC students will have the opportunity to explore the Hyperlinked Library model through recorded presentations and other content, as well as practical assignments that encourage students to apply what they are learning. For example, students will expand their learning by developing an emerging technologies plan and social media policy. Badges will be awarded as students move through the course, culminating with a certificate of completion.

Stephens developed and created the Hyperlinked Library course over the last few years, drawing on experiences working with libraries located across North America and internationally, including Germany, Australia, Turkey, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. He will pull in global experts and resources as part of the Hyperlinked Library MOOC learning experience.

Individuals interested in registering for the Hyperlinked Library MOOC are encouraged to immediately sign up for the course. An interest list is currently being formed, and the first 400 individuals to sign up will have priority registration.

More on the #hyperlibMOOC from Kyle Jones

Please don’t miss:

http://thecorkboard.org/stephens-and-jones-to-co-teach-a-mooc-version-of-the-hyperlinked-library/

A snippet:

There are a number of reasons this project excites me, and I think it should excite you as a potential student:

  1. The Hyperlinked Library model takes a humanist approach to user services and their intersection with ICTs: this is not a technology course, but it is a critical examination of the dual shaping of LIS professionals and technologies as they work in tandem to serve library users;
  2. Both Michael and I believe in a constructionist approach to learning: this is not a consumption course where the lecture is a vade mecum to hold onto closely.  A lecture is only a piece of the learning experience that, in our mind, serves as a foundation for exploration, critical examination, and–most importantly–as the base on which other artifacts are created.  As such, the course will be designed in order for students to learn from each other and develop useful products that can inform their daily practices;
  3. The learning management system is a walled garden which restricts the participatory aims of our teaching and denies students the opportunity to share their work and experiences with the world.  Using WordPress and a combination of plugins, we’ve been teaching our courses using a blog-based social course system that we’ve developed over a number of years.  This system has proven its efficacy time and time again, and reviews from students in their own posts and our course reviews indicate that learning online in an organic social environment has distinct advantages over structured, both in power and in content, learning management systems.  We’re excited to create a brand new iteration of our system and to scale it for hundreds of users.

On this last point, I will be leading a cohort of students this summer to build the site.  Students will support in the research, development, and deployment of the MOOC.  Activities will include: gathering research materials on topics related to MOOCs; participating in the construction of the course site by helping with elements of content strategy and management, information architecture, user experience testing, gamificiation, and design; developing a knowledge base and self-paced instructional materials (e.g., screencasts); and assisting in the instructional design of the teaching and learning experience.  I’ve already received a number of inquiries from students about this opportunity and I’m excited to meet them come June.