Category Archives: Librarians, Libraries & the Profession

News: Karen Schneider Wins the Elizabeth Futas Catalyst For Change Award

A heartfelt congratulations to Karen!

From http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/02/karen-schneider-wins-elizabeth-futas-catalyst-change-award

CHICAGO – Karen G. Schneider, university librarian at Holy Names University, Oakland, Calif., is the 2014 recipient of the American Library Association (ALA) Elizabeth Futas Catalyst for Change Award. This award is given biennially to an individual for making positive changes in the profession of librarianship and consists of a 24K gold-framed citation and $1,000 contributed by the Elizabeth Futas Memorial Fund of the American Library Association.

“The 2014 Elizabeth Futas Catalyst for Change Award jury chose to honor Karen G. Schneider for a career noted by risk taking, inspiring and mentoring colleagues, and making opportunities for change out of the challenges to librarianship,” said Ann Symons, committee chair.

Throughout her career Schneider has served as a leader and innovator, creative thinker and writer, librarian and technology expert. As a member of the American Library Association Council, she has served many terms providing insightful and constructive discussion to issues facing the organization. While sometimes seeming outspoken, she has always been an articulate proponent of accountability, change and action.

Her blog, Free Range Librarian, was one of the earliest in the profession and her book, “A Practical Guide to Internet Filters,” resulted in her being selected as an expert witness in the Mainstream Loudon First Amendment case. Both serve as examples of her groundbreaking and life-long commitment within the library community.

“The Futas jury was unanimous in its choice for this award,” Symons said. “The committee was impressed by her unusual combination of integrity, skill, intellectual energy and commitment. As an innovator and catalyst for change, she has developed one of the earliest training programs for the Queens Library, wrote one of the first regular columns on Technology for American Libraries, and  founded both the Resource Sharing Committee of the Statewide California Library Consortium and the first rapid delivery network for California’s private academic libraries. It is this energy and passion for change that make Ms. Schneider the perfect recipient for the Elizabeth Futas Catalyst for Change Award.”

Members of the 2014 Elizabeth Futas Catalyst for Change Award Jury are: Ann K. Symons, Chair, Douglas, Alaska.; Holly Clark Carroll, Poudre River Public Library District, Fort Collins, Colo.; Judith J. Field, Wayne State University, Northville, Mich.; Samantha Schmehl Hines, Missoula College Library, Mont.; and Denise M. Zielinski, Joliet Public Library, Ill..

The Futas Award will be presented on Sunday, June 29, at the ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas.

TTWNostalgic

A New Logo for TTW

A shout out to John LeMasney this Monday morning as I finish spiffing up our new look here at Tame the Web. An email from ILI prompted me to ponder a new logo for TTW last week. I asked for thoughts from Facebook and John, a designer and technology consultant/trainer, messaged offering to work with me for free!

I follow John’s work on FB and must admit I was thrilled to get to work with him.

I filled out a “Design brief” at his site, we had a phone chat and then finished the process via Facebook chat. The Red Heart image above was an early iteration that I appreciated, but it felt a bit “nostalgic” to me.  If I was the type who got tattoos… :-)

His creative process is highlighted here:

http://lemasney.com/consulting/2014/02/01/32-365-designing-logo-tame-web-michael-stephens/

The finished logos are here:

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Please click through and checkout John’s design work and checkout his presentation/training topics. I recommend his work highly.

Thanks John!

planning

The User is Still Not Broken by Brian Kenney

Don’t miss Brian Kenney’s new column:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/libraries/article/60780-the-user-is-still-not-broken.html

Meet People Where They Are—Not Where We Want Them to Be

Libraries are very good at organizing and presenting content in anticipation of users’ needs. From cataloging resources to creating booklists, to offering workshops and classes, we’re all about meeting people where we think they may be. The trouble is, not all individuals fit into our elaborate schema.

It’s difficult to genuinely meet people where they are. It’s far easier to set up a system that we think might help most users—and a whole lot cheaper. Meeting people where they are can take a serious commitment of staff time.

In the past decade, libraries have experimented with creating alternatives to their “build it and they will come” paradigm. Teen librarians, working with teen advisory groups, have encouraged their users to help determine teen programs and services. Letting the public have a role in ordering materials is one way to open a library’s collection to its readers. Book-a-librarian programs allow us to focus on our users’ needs in more depth than is possible at a reference desk.

For several years, my library provided drop-in e-reader help. But in the past 12 months, interest in e-readers has taken a nosedive, so we expanded the program to offer help for other types of devices. The response has been enthusiastic: the public has hauled in cameras, phones, laptops, and iPads. No amount of handouts, FAQs on our Web site, and classes could begin to address the variety of questions we have received, and few programs have generated gratitude.

Technology isn’t something we offer, it’s something we do, and helping people understand how to use their technology is perfectly in line with what libraries do best: respond to people’s needs.

News: Library Effect Launches

Jan Holmquist shared this with me:

There is a new attempt to break out of the echo chamber and share the many different sides of library activities and the positive effects they have  on the communities they serve.library-effect-600 The goal of The Library Effect is to share stories about the many facets of library activities — and their outcomes — with a general audience. Good luck to Shannon K. McDonough (@shnmcd) with this fine initiative.

Read the first edition of The Library Effect here: http://thelibraryeffect.com/ – Then share with your library and non-library friends.

https://twitter.com/libraryeffect

From Michael : In the first edition you can read why Jan Holmquist thinks the library is the hummingbird (http://thelibraryeffect.com/2014/01/16/the-library-is-the-hummingbird/). You can also read about the library as community living room and mobilizing a volunteer army. Good luck to all involved with this initiative.

Congrats to Corinne Hill, LJ’s Librarian of the Year

“Honestly, I simply wanted to manage a library the way I had always wished I had been managed,” says Hill, with a laugh, when asked to describe her management style. “Coming up in this field, you get so tired of hearing ‘No,’ or ‘Let me tell you why that is not going to work,’ or ‘We tried that years ago; it didn’t work.’ ”

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/01/awards/corinne-hill-ljs-2014-librarian-of-the-year/

What do you see?

 

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I know it’s trendy to fight the system and cry that we are all becoming slaves of technology, but this attitude overlooks that computers and phones are tools for communicating. When someone thinks I’m an idiot smiling at a machine, I’m actually smiling at my girlfriend who is 10000 miles away and whom I would have never met if not for these newfangled electronics. As they say: when the wise man points to the moon, the fool looks at the finger.

http://hugtherobots.tumblr.com/post/69627090387/i-know-its-trendy-to-fight-the-system-and-cry