Category Archives: Library Innovators

News: Outside the Lines

Outsideoutside the lines launches september 2014

Weeklong Celebration Gets Communities Thinking of Libraries 

in a Whole New Way

DENVER–April 14, 2014–Inspired by the urgent need to shift perceptions of libraries, a group of Colorado library marketers and directors have developed a bold, new campaign that reintroduces libraries to their communities and gets people thinking – and talking – about these organizations in a whole new way. Outside the Lines is a weeklong celebration, Sept. 14-20, 2014, demonstrating the creativity and innovation happening in libraries.

Organizations of all types can participate by hosting at least one event or campaign during the week of Sept. 14-20, 2014, that:

  • Gets people thinking – and talking – about libraries in a different way
  • Showcases the library out in the community as well as in the library
  • Highlights how the library is relevant to people’s lives
  • Represents the organization’s local community
  • Is active versus passive – gets people engaged
  • Is extraordinary and unexpected
  • Most importantly, is fun!

Libraries can sign up to participate at getoutsidethelines.org. They can also see a list of participating libraries and view videos that provide creative inspiration. To date, 40 libraries from across the U.S. and Canada have signed up to participate and will announce their Outside the Lines activities in the coming months.

The purpose of Outside the Lines is to reintroduce libraries to local communities by helping people understand how libraries have changed into dynamic centers for engagement, helping libraries better understand how to market themselves and share their stories, and providing a venue for libraries to work together to demonstrate their creativity and innovation.

ABOUT OUTSIDE THE LINES

Outside the Lines is an R-Squared initiative designed by Colorado library marketers and directors that gets libraries “walking the walk” – taking action to show our communities how important libraries are and how they’ve changed.

This celebration takes many of the concepts discussed at RSquared, The Risk & Reward Conference, such as creativity, customer curiosity, culture, community and creative spaces, and puts them into action where they count – in our local communities. Learn more at getoutsidethelines.org.

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Contact:

Amber DeBerry, 303-688-7641

adeberry@dclibraries.org

or

Stacie Ledden, 303-405-3286

sledden@anythinklibraries.org

 

 

Congrats to Jan Holmquist, 2014 Library Journal Mover and Shaker

 http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/people/movers-shakers-2014/jan-holmquist-movers-shakers-2014-tech-leaders/Movers2014webBigHolmquistb

Jan Holmquist’s nominators describe him as a “global librarian,” and it’s easy to see why. In addition to his current work as head of development for Denmark’s Guldborgsund libraries, Holmquist’s side projects tend to involve collaboration with librarians all over the world. He is engaged with ongoing international projects in Germany and the Read Watch Play Twitter reading group based in Australia. And in 2011 and 2012, he worked with librarians in the United States and the UK on the “Buy India a Library Project” and then built awareness of the program’s efforts with a presentation on crowdfunding for libraries at the Bibliothekartag conference in Hamburg, Germany.

Congrats to Jan Holmquist, who was just named a 2014 Mover and Shaker by Library Journal!

TTW Contributor Justin Hoenke: Congrats to Jan!  I’ve had the great pleasure of being connected with Jan via Twitter since 2010.  Jan’s tweets and writings inspired me from the start to be the best librarian I can be.  Jan is one of the most honest and sincere people I have ever met.  He is truly the “global librarian” whose thoughts and teachings are held to no international boundary.  Jan writes and shares from the heart.  I am proud to not only call him a colleague but a friend as well. 

Jan and Justin in Hamburg, Germany at the 2012 Bibliothekartag Library Confrernce

Jan and Justin in Hamburg, Germany at the 2012 Bibliothekartag Library Confrernce

 Michael Stephens: I’ve known Jan for many years and he’s been a welcome contributor to TTW. I will never forget a brilliant afternoon spent walking and talking with Jan  all over Helsinki at IFLA 2012. We had so much to discuss: libraries, learning, mobile devices, the future. It was then we decided to partner for research for the first iteration of the 23 Mobile Things program at his library. I am so impressed with his vision of staff exploring and playing with mobile apps as a means to experience what mobile tech offers to users and libraries. Jan was also an excellent choice to go a guest lecture on mobile technology for the #hyperlibMOOC and his innovative video playlist was well-received. (Look, a Moose!)

As Justin mentions above, I truly believe Jan is a perfect example of a humanistic, global librarian, one who embodies what Lawrence Clark Powell wrote about when he described “A good librarian is a librarian, a person with good health and warm heart, trained by study, and seasoned by experience to catalyze books and people.”  For Jan, I’d venture to say he’s helping to catalyze librarians, learners and everyone with the power of technology.

Jan and Michael in Helsinki

Jan and Michael in Helsinki

 Jan at TTW

Buy India a Library project

-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor
23 Mobile Things

Embracing Creativity and Play at CityLibraries Townsville

Warren Cheetham writes:

I am very proud of this, because it’s taken a cultural change of about five years to allow something like this video to be produced.

How so?

Digital storytelling is relatively cheap and easy to do, using the tools that most people carry with them each day – tablets, digital cameras and smart phones. Encouraging staff to take time to play with those devices at work has taken a lot of encouragement and support. It was seen as something outside of the ‘real job’ and the idea of taking work time to play seemed a bit wrong.
The second part of the journey involves the wider organisation understanding the opportunities social media can offer, to engage with our community, and not just communicate one way, in a formal, corporate voice using media releases.

In a world where 100 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute, the production of this video might not seem too significant, but for me, it represents the end of old ideas and methods, and the releasing of staff to embrace play and show creativity in their daily work.

And don’t miss this post about Makerspace “rules:’ http://stainedglasswaterfall.blogspot.com/2013/09/make-good-things-make-things-good-our.html

Laptop & iPad Checkout Machine at SJCPL

Posted to Facebook via the South Bend Tribune:

sjcpllaptop

Laptop and iPads have long been available for free in-library use at the St. Joe County Public Library, but now they’re available via these new vending machines in the lobby at the Main Library. Patrons must be at least 18 years old and have a county library card. Each laptop computer or iPad may be checked out for three hours for free. There is a $1 charge for each hour after that. Is this a service you think you’ll use?
South Bend Tribune photo

Kickstarter Campaign for Circulating Ideas by Steve Thomas

CircIdeasKICKSTARTING THE CIRCULATION

Two years ago, I created the Circulating Ideas podcast, where I talk to cool, innovative librarians about the work that they’re doing to move the profession forward. Ultimately, I’d love if non-librarians listened and learned about all the great work that we do, but I’m thrilled with the fact that most of my audience are my fellow librarians, gleaning ideas and inspiration from my guests.

I do the show on my own time, on my own dime, so upgrading and improving the show takes a personal investment, but I couldn’t do the show on my own. Without my guests, the show is nothing and there is equipment and software I need to make the show happen. So investing in a new mic, purchasing a domain name, and upgrading the software on my machine, among other thing, are all things I’ve done in the past and will continue to do in the future. However, I have goals for the show that I cannot achieve in the timeframe I’d like because I’ve got other things I need to be spending money on (for instance, my children enjoy having food to eat).

So what to do?

Though I’d vaguely considered the idea of doing a fundraiser of some kind for awhile now, I never really felt comfortable with it until I saw Amanda Palmer’s TED Talk, “The Art of Asking”. I’m not going to take the time here to just repeat what she says, but basically, it helped me become okay with the idea of asking for financial assistance for the show. The rise of crowdfunding sites has put the power to fund the creative projects they want to see into the hands of the people. It’s not quite the second coming of patronage, as the artists still maintain most of the control of their product, but it’s empowering nonetheless to cut out the middleman and give funding directly to the source of the creative energy.

So, I created a Kickstarter campaign for the show, and it’s been successful beyond my wildest dreams. I reached full funding for the initial goal in less than two days, but I’ve got lots of other plans for expansion beyond that initial ask, which are laid out in the stretch goals.

If you enjoy the show, I would appreciate any help you can give, even if it’s just passing on the word about the campaign, writing a review on iTunes or just listening to the episodes as they come out. I hope you learn and grow as much as I do from every episode. Our profession is filled with so many interesting people doing such fantastic work. I can’t wait for you to meet more of them through the show.

Note from Michael: Please support Circulating Ideas if you can!