Category Archives: Makerspace & Creation

Oops I broke the 3D printer! by TTW Contributor Justin Hoenke

Oops!  I broke the 3D printer!  And you know what?  It’s OK.

2013-11-13 10.54.03
Bits of a 3D printer, post hacksaw

One night on The 2nd Floor of the Chattanooga Public Library I attempted to make 3 Stretchlet bracelets on our 3D printer at one time. We’re taking our 3D printer to the local children’s museum later this month and wanted to built up our arsenal of 3D printed giveaways.  My idea was to attempt to speed up that process and boy oh boy did it not work.

I came back to see the mess you see below.  Something went wrong and our whole extruder was covered in plastic.  I attempted to chip bits of the plastic but I had no luck.  I called on James and Geoff from The 4th Floor to assess the damage.  They took our 3D printer away, let us borrow one of theirs (thank you oh so much), and came back down 15 minutes later with the diagnosis: the electronics were a-ok, but they had to cut out some bits with a hacksaw.  They contacted MakerBot support and the final verdict was in…

Thanks for contacting MakerBot Support! The part that are you are inquiring about can definately be purchased by contacting MakerBot Support at 347.334.6800 Option 2, MOnday through Friday 9am-6pm (EST).
 
The name of the part is called Extruder Carriage and the cost of the part is $12.
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Phew. The 3D printer will be good to go in a week or so, and the damage wasn’t too bad.  What did I learn besides the obvious “don’t make too many stretchlet bracelets at one time”?  Well, it helped me see that even if I make a mistake with this 3D printer thing that it’s all going to be ok.  It’s just a machine that can be fixed.  It’s not the end of the world.
Now I have this awesome pile of plastic and bits of a 3D printer lying around that everyone on the 2nd Floor can show to tweens and teens and say “see, we messed up and that’s OK because we learned something.”
-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor

 

This Used to be the AV Room

edmontonhttp://metronews.ca/news/edmonton/774745/edmonton-public-library-makes-space-for-tech-friendly-creations/

CDs, DVDs and video games have been moved from what used to be the audio-visual room on the main level of the Stanley A. Milner EPL branch downtown, where renovations began Friday on the Makerspace.

Making mistakes in our daily work: A TTW Conversation between Warren Cheetham and Justin Hoenke

Warren: Hi Justin! I found this weird avant garde art video online that you’re featured in! I didn’t realize you were into that – tell me more!

Justin: No, not an art video…I was actually testing out On Air Google+ Hangouts with my co-worker James McNutt. We’re using the On Air Hangouts to record the guest speakers we have for our DEV DEV:<summer of code/> camp at the Chattanooga Public Library.

W: So it was just a test? Why put it online?

J: Yah, just a test.  We put it online because that’s the whole point of the on air hangout…to record a conversation and share it online.  Plus, it was kind of neat to watch how we worked through any trouble we had.

W: When I visited Chattanooga Library a few weeks ago, Nate Hill explained the concept of staff working in the public area on the 4th Floor, being visible to everyone, showing the library work processes on the big public white-board wall etc. – is sharing this video an extension of that thinking?

J: Yes. What we’re doing on the 2nd Floor of the Chattanooga Public Library (our space dedicated to ages 0-18) lines up really well with what the 4th Floor is going for.  We want to try neat things and see if they stick.  We’re happy to show our successes, failures, and the road we took to get there.

W: Can you share any other ways you’re putting your tests and trials out there?

Photo by Warren Cheetham, June 2013.
Photo by Warren Cheetham, June 2013.

J: Sure!  We’ve got a bunch of extra tables just sitting around as we remodel/reshuffle how the 2nd Floor looks.  Instead of them just sitting around collecting dust, we’ve made them into what we’re calling creation stations.  One has a button maker sitting on it that kids and teens can use to make buttons.  Another has a whole mess of art supplies.  Another has a bowl in the shape of a bear that I found sitting in a closet.  That bear is now the AWESOME BEAR. Anyone can come up to it, write something awesome on a slip of paper and put it in the AWESOME BEAR.  The AWESOME BEAR will then share all of the awesome things kids and teens see around their community!  Somedays it works, other days it doesn’t.

W: But isn’t that embarrassing putting all the errors and mistakes out there for the public to see?

J: Not at all. Part of the fun is trying out new things and seeing how the community reacts.  If they don’t respond to something we do on the 2nd Floor, all that says to me is “keep on thinking, keep on trying.”  It’s actually pretty exciting.

W: That’s very cool. I think it’s good for us to remember that while we might be good at librarianship, and a few others things, there are people in our community who use our libraries who are much better at certain things, and their input and observations on our library processes and trials can help build better services.

So I see you’re doing a summer coding camp at Chattanooga – what is that teaching the teens about keeping your mistakes open and public? Software development is a wonderful example of how something (like computer code) can get better and better the more it’s distributed and developed by many people.

J: When I was a teen, I used to think that adults never made mistakes.  They were the ones in power and they never messed anything up.  Boy, I was wrong.  That way of thinking had a big impact on me as I grew into adulthood.  I put a lot of pressure on myself to be that “perfect adult” but what I was doing was something that I could not keep up with.  No one is perfect.  We all make mistakes and you know what?  We grow from those mistakes.

I think making these mistakes and keeping them public is a great thing.  It shows that we’re all human and that we’re all learning and growing.

W: We’re messing around with a 3D printer here, and one of my first pieces was dodgy so we finished the print before it was complete. I was going to throw it out but Neal my co-worker stopped me and pointed out that the print actually showed the insides and structure of a 3D print. Turns out, it’s a piece that other staff look at and are intrigued by the most!

3D print

J: That’s so rad to hear! When we create something, of course we want it to be perfect.  But our colleagues and friends will see things a different way.  Your idea of something that is junk may be someone else’s idea of gold.

A few weeks ago when you visited Chattanooga, you talked about how Australia is planning and implementing a country wide fiber optic system.  With a project that big, there’s gotta be some mistakes that are made along the way.  How has your country been managing this project and any mistakes that are made?  I can imagine that if there are any bumps along the way there may be a huge public reaction.

W: Such a big, expensive project comes with a lot of scrutiny, and every mistake or misjudgment can easily get blown out of proportion by the project’s critics. One thing that this and other technology related projects has taught me is the economic concept of ‘opportunity cost’. Some of the criticisms leveled at Australia’s National Broadband Network include the idea that we should wait until the relevant technology gets cheaper, more reliable, etc. The opportunity cost is that while we’re waiting for that time, we miss out on the benefits that implementing that technology now could bring.

I think this thinking helps to round out the idea of ‘making mistakes’ in our daily work. By not making mistakes, by not taking responsible risks, by waiting until someone else makes it perfect before can adopt it, we miss an opportunity to benefit from any success of the project now.

Mistakes

-Post by Warren Cheetham  and Tame The Web Contributor Justin Hoenke

 

 Warren Cheetham is the Coordinator of Information and Digital Services at CityLibraries Townsville. He has worked in public libraries for twenty-one years, and his professional interests include the application of technology to public libraries, and how to best deliver information services, reader engagement, corporate research services and training to library staff and customers in an online environment.

Heard Off the Street: Library’s 3-D printer spits out all kinds of fun and learning (By TTW Contributor Justin Hoenke)

Photo by Anna Bentley/Post-Gazette
Photo by Anna Bentley/Post-Gazette

Make sure you check out Library’s 3-D printer spits out all kinds of fun and learning over at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.  I’ve been talking with Saxonburg Area Library Director Erin Wincek about 3D printing over the past few months and I am in love with the things she’s doing for her community.  I also love the support that her community and her board has for her passion:

“We’re going to grab up these fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders and show them their future,” said Ms. Wincek, who thinks the printer could influence some of their career choices.

Library board president Matt Phillips said Ms. Wincek’s enthusiasm is why the library has the printer.

“It’s prompted us as a board to share in her passion,” said Mr. Phillips, who owns an insurance agency in Saxonburg. “We’re not a big library, and we have something that many large libraries and institutions do not have.”

Erin’s got the vision and community support.  When you have those, amazing things can happen in public libraries.

-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor

Maker Space Disruption – New PW Piece by Brian Kenney

Brian Kenney’s new piece in Publishers Weekly is on Maker Spaces:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/libraries/article/56603-meet-your-makers.html

I love his take:

What’s radical about maker spaces in libraries? Pretty much everything. Maker spaces are messy in a library world that values order, disruptive in a culture run by schedules, chaotic in a profession that did, after all, develop the Dewey Decimal System.

Hill, who has an empty floor she is using for her maker space, says it’s up to the community to determine how they use it. The library is there to provide support, but she has no idea what direction it will take.

Maker spaces also utilize STEM skills (science, technology, engineering, and math), skills that public libraries are notoriously poor at supporting. Traditionally staffed by a bunch of English majors, there’s not much on our shelves between DK 101 Great Science Experiments and the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology. STEM makes us anxious.

And maker spaces are inherently intergenerational in institutions that make rigid distinctions—about place, access, and behavior—based on age. Just how comfortable will most libraries be with an environment in which a fifth-grader collaborates with a 40-year-old?

Makerspace Lawsuits – A TTW Guest Post by Rick Thomchick

Monica Harris, a librarian from Oak Park, Illinois, recently posted a great article to the MakerSpaces and the Participatory Library group on Facebook about 3D printing and intellectual property in which Chris Anderson declared, “we’re going to get sued.”

I wryly replied with a link to a Wired article that the lawsuits had already begun. Michael Weinberg, an attorney with Public Knowledge who was interviewed for the article, characterized 3D printers as a “disruptive technology” that is raising many intellectual property issues, and Monica pointed out that 3D printers have exposed the differences between copyright and patent law.

Physical objects such as figurines, models, or Lego building bricks, are subject to patent law. And unlike copyrights, patents have a limited lifespan (20 years, sometimes more). In fact, Weinberg believes hobbyists should worry more about copying artistic patterns or designs on an object. “That violates copyright law,” claims Weinberg.

Weinberg ominously warned of the risk that Games Workshop and other toy manufacturers would lobby politicians to enact patent “reform” laws similar to SOPA. Which brings us back Chris Anderson’s proclamation of impending litigation against the Maker movement. So what’s to be done? Another member of the Facebook group shared some helpful links including the EFF’s efforts to keep 3D printing open, and a discussion of legal issues (scroll to bottom of page) on makerlibrarian.com (wow, there’s already a website for that!).

It’s not hard to envision yet another incumbent industry fighting the tides of technological change. But I can’t help but think that there is an opportunity for Games Workshop to market their own brand of 3D printers and charge for access to official design patterns, or to partner with MakerBot. Such a move could help them extend their brand, reduce their operational costs (labor, shipping, packaging, etc.) and engage their customers with the thrill of on-demand mass customization. It might sound crazy, but then again, how many libraries were using 3D printers when I first started my MLIS studies in 2009?

The Portal at Tippecanoe County PL

Note from Michael: I met Tippecanoe County PL (Lafayette, IN) director Jos Holman at IPLA last week. He told me about his library’s creation space “The Portal.” S. Neal Starkey, Head Technology Librarian, followed up with some info and a link. I thought this was a good example of what’s possible in a medium-sized midwest library.

The Portal is a new public space the Tippecanoe County (Indiana) Public Library system custom-designed to give its customers a place to learn, create, and interact with new technologies. This space is currently populated with a mix of desktops, laptops, and tablets. The design and seating are flexible — accommodating individuals, organized groups, and impromptu collaborations. Most design, furniture, and equipment choices allow for possible additions and changes in future years.

Four specialized suites satisfy customers of many ages, abilities, and interests:

The Videoconferencing Suite features a SMART™ Board, web cam, and flexible meeting furniture. A retractable wall converts the larger area into two smaller training spaces.

The Language Learning Suite provides an enclosed space with headsets for speaking and listening. It currently offers Mango® Languages.

The Family Suite offers PCs set up for adults and children, as well as educational technology featuring LeapFrog® LeapPads™, Tag™ readers, and Tag™ books.

The Digital Arts Suite presents two iMacs with an array of high-end audio, photo, and video editing software. Professional-level production equipment includes digital video cameras, midi keyboard, midi audio interface, graphics capture tablets, and a green screen for the filming/editing original content. In addition, this suite currently features equipment for digitizing home movies, photos, slides, and negatives.
www.tcpl.lib.in.us/theportal