Category Archives: SJSU SLIS

WISE Award & Thoughts on Online Teaching

From SJSU SLIS: The Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) consortium recognized three faculty members from the School of Library and Information Science at San José State University with a 2013 Excellence in Online Teaching Award. Dr. Michelle Holschuh Simmons, Dr. Michael Stephens, and Melba Tomeo were all recipients of this national award that honors the accomplishments of online educators. 

I am honored to amongst these incredible educators. As part of the award, WISE asked us to share thoughts about online teaching practice. Read about all of the WISE winners here: http://www.wiseeducation.org/faculty/bestpractices2013.aspx

 

Here are mine:

In the 2012 Horizon Report, the authors explore various trends impacting higher education. Two of the identified trends resonate deeply:

 The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured.

People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want to.

These ideas have lead me to incorporating these practices into my teaching:

Everything is Beta: We use a bespoke course platform created with WordPress and Buddypress. The platform can be augmented with plugins and enhancements per the request of students or the instructor. We try things. We test the limits. We embrace a bit of chaos.

Learning Everywhere: One of my recurrent themes of late. Students should be able to access course content, their reflection blogs and slaws activity streams in multiple ways. Multiple channels of audio, video and text-based content and a mobile interface allow them to participate wherever they happen to be.

Broad Creativity: I encourage students to think creatively about the deliverables in my classes. The wide variety of tools available to students learning online allows for any number of video, audio, and media-based expressions of their assignments.

Always Learning: This one is for me. I tell my classes that the minute I stop learning, stop exploring, stop moving forward, I need to pack up my virtual office and go sell tomatoes by the roadside. I want to model that behavior so my students come out of our program armed with a thriving personal learning network and a desire to always be learning.

Be Human: I’ve shared this one before but it bears repeating. Be human. Share yourself. Look to make that personal connection. I use a “Guilty Pleasures” forum in my courses. Nothing levels the playing field like confessing your favorite guilt viewing, listening, or reading  habits. This also means giving up a certain degree of authority.  I’d argue we are no longer in the “Command and Control” business, Now, we guide, facilitate and push, ever so gently, our students toward their goals.

This quote from Stephen Barnes resonates with my philosophy of teaching online: ““We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze…”

The Shallows by Nicholas Carr – A TTW Guest Post by Dayna Armstrong

Context Book Assignment: The Shallows by Nicholas Carr

For my context book assignment I admit that I picked my book solely based on its title. The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr was my first choice as I found the title very thought provoking and I immediately asked myself “What is the internet really doing to my brain? Has it really done anything at all? How do I know if it has? I knew it was the book for me when it got me thinking before evening reading the first page.

After reading The Shallows, I was left both in awe and horror over how much influence the Internet has had over my ability to concentrate, contemplate, and engage with both print based and online information. I can remember back to a time when reading was a luxury I treasured. I could immerse myself within the confines of a book for hours, never tiring, and always craving the words on the next page. However, that voracious love of deep and meaningful reading has slowly given way to adult bouts of ADD where reading the contents of a lengthy article or book in now more of a chore than a pleasure. I ask myself ‘has my love affair with the Internet sacrificed my ability to engage in more than surface level reading? Is the quick, disjointed, and distracted information so readily available at the stroke of a button worth the slow demise of my ability to engage in the act of reading wholeheartedly, not distractedly and fragmented, impeded by my need to “stay connected?” These are questions I believe many of us have asked ourselves or should begin to ask ourselves. As information professionals we need to start thinking about how the Internet driven brain impacts our profession and more importantly how can we support the idea of tradition versus innovation when today’s brains seem to be wired for instant access not technologies of days gone by. This has been an issue at the forefront of the profession and library’s have responded and will continue to respond to this shift in user ability, demand, and need facilitated by rapidity of the Internet.

What I loved most about Carr’s book is that he raises the question of how have “tools of the mind” which have been in a progressive state of evolution over the last few centuries, altered and reshaped the way we think and interact not only with information but with each other? From the creation of the alphabet, to Gutenberg’s printing press, to the Internet today, Carr charts an evolutionary course which transcends the human mind past the realm of intellectual engagement, connection, and community, into what he calls the “intellectual shallows.”  I ask myself and others, how do we navigate our way through these so called “intellectual shallows?” I don’t think there is a one size fits all answer to this question.

I think today’s librarians can glean a lot from The Shallows in terms of how a patron’s rewired and remapped “Internet” influenced brain impacts library service and ways in which they can as library professionals support this “mental evolution” while still holding true to traditional values such as deep reading and fostering of a user’s deep level knowledge and understanding. Today’s libraries have already embraced and adapted to this change in numerous ways, as most public library’s today are no longer synonymous with the term “oasis of bookish tranquility” instead becoming buzzing hubs of information and constant connectors between users and information via the Internet, “The predominant sound in the modern library is the tapping of keys, not the turning of pages” (Carr, 2010, pg. 97). By providing access to the Internet, digitizing materials for easier access, and facilitating and nurturing online communities, hyperlinked libraries are continually working to appease brains that are in a constant state of flux. The DOK library instantly comes to mind as they have been able to fuse this love of tradition with the need of innovation spurred by the Internet. Their use of technology as a means of reinforcing community and culture is important as it does so in a way that meets the needs of Internet wired brains where immediacy, relevancy, and innovation is key in keeping them connected not only the library but to their community. The demise of the “human elements” Carr speaks about is kept very much alive at DOK as technology and the Internet are not seen as opposing forces to a library’s humanness rather a companion that helps foster communication, interaction, collaboration, and community.

“To remain vital, culture must be renewed in the minds of the members of every generation. Outsource memory, and culture withers” (Carr, 2010, pg. 197). This quote resonated with me and got me thinking about how through hyperlinked libraries and participatory service, community culture is cultivated, fostered, and celebrated by engaging patrons in storytelling, sharing, and collaboration through the use of technology which works to digitize, preserve, and share a community’s cultural fabric and memories. I think one very important aspect of hyperlinked libraries is that they strive to keep communities connected to culture through the use of various technologies none of which work to supplant the beauty and power of a tangible, personal, and heartfelt interaction, but rather serve as a supplement. Much of Carr’s book focuses on the idea that “human elements are outmoded and dispensable” and that the Internet has the power and capacity to make the human mind in some ways obsolete and a “slave to the machine.” But I argue that this form of enslavement is somewhat self induced. We as a society love the seductive allure of the Internet and its ability to keep us connected and relevant. I believe the Internet has changed the way I think but not necessarily for the worse. Yes I may not be able to read as in-depth as I once did, but I have access to a plethora of information I can utilize for the good of others and as a library professional can help use that “rewiring and reprogramming” to help guide and support the information needs of my users who also find themselves trying to navigate the unchartered waters of the “intellectual shallows.”

I could write pages upon pages about my thoughts on Carr’s book but instead I decided to create a brief Animoto video which highlights key points, quotes, questions and ideas I pulled from the text and its connection to hyperlinked libraries and the library profession in general. This video is for those of us whose brains no longer read lengthy paragraphs with ease! Its purpose is to get you thinking about how the internet has changed your brain (whether positively or negatively) and how this rewiring, remapping, and reprogramming of the mind impacts your role as a library professional. I hope you enjoy!

My Animoto Video (2 min): http://animoto.com/play/EzermFC0VVqog9Ywj01oKg

References
Carr, N. G. (2010). The shallows: What the Internet is doing to our brains. New York: W.W. Norton.

 

DaynaArmstrongDayna currently resides in Northern California and is currently in her last semester of San Jose State University’s School of Library and Information Science. Her program focus has been academic librarianship and she hopes to integrate her love of social media and technology into future positions. In her spare time she loves reading, hiking, and spending time with her husband and their five cats!

Creating Library Currents in a Web 2.0 World – A TTW Guest Post by Mickel Paris

After completing Dr. Stephens SJSU online course in Fall of 2012, I was inspired to develop a personal blog on library innovations and social media in libraries. In many of our course assignments and projects, we explored and played around with Web 2.0 tools, and using templates developed by Professor Stephens, we trained on how to implement these tools in our libraries and personal lives. We learned how to talk about them with others, from our patrons to our administrators. Blogging about my two loves – social media and libraries – would become a worthwhile cause.

The Social Media Plan – http://librarycurrents.com/series/planning-lc

One of my favorite assignments in The Hyperlinked Library was the social media plan. Imagine a strategic plan, marketing plan, bibliography and road map that can be implemented tomorrow, and you have Dr. Stephen’s social media plan. I immediately saw the appropriateness and applicability of the social media plan in developing a professional blog, and approached Dr. Stephens in the Summer of 2013 to be my faculty advisor for an independent study project (LIBR 298) entitled “Library Currents.”

In the planning phase, I determined a general concept for Library Currents (www.librarycurrents.com), which was to create a blog that reviewed social media technologies and included them in a directory that librarians could assess for reference work. But I had to keep my mind open to other avenues of content, if the audience for social media in libraries wasn’t there. My first order of business was to create listening posts using RSS feeds and social network news feeds, such as those found on Facebook and Twitter. I added feeds of authoritative blogs and library-related organizations to not only listen to what they had to say about emerging technologies, but also to converse with them as well.

Listening to the Conversation – http://librarycurrents.com/series/research-lc

In the research phase, I read papers provided by Dr. Stephens on his research in social media and Web 2.0 technologies, while also listening to the RSS and social media feeds that I set up in the planning phase. I followed Pew Internet Research data and reviewed the recent literature both online and in scholarly journals to determine if a library blog focused on social media would have any legs. What I discovered was eye-opening.

I learned that social media doesn’t necessarily stand on its own. In my research, I discovered that social media was intertwined with other types of innovations, such as emerging technologies, augmented reality, and informational trends. With this information, I knew that Library Currents would focus on broader library innovations combined with social media.

The planning and research phases ended with the development of a 7-page social media plan for the Library Currents blog. The final version of the document can be found at: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B2EVnCwWuZE5UFB1Z1JoTVo1SGs

Putting the Plan into Action – http://librarycurrents.com/series/implementation-lc

In my research during the implementation phase, I discovered that WordPress, Drupal and Joomla were the top three open source content management systems (CMS) internationally. I decided to try out and create demos of each CMS, grading them on a 100-point scale in areas such as user experience, functionality, and development capability. WordPress scored the highest among the three CMS platforms, and a clean copy was installed for use as the CMS of Library Currents. A cost analysis was performed in time and finances, which is detailed in the implementation report, found at https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B2OLXz0nbffdc0dIazRLVGJWM28/

Creating Content and Evaluating the Site – http://librarycurrents.com/series/content-creation-evaluation

In the final phase of the Library Currents blog project, I created content using the new WordPress interface, and populated the Library 2.0 Directory with web 2.0 and LIS resources. The resources uploaded into the directory would be the subjects covered in my blog postings, making the directory complementary to the blog. For evaluation of the new blog’s design and content, I created a poll using Survey Monkey, and would create more assessments going into 2014. Future posts will discuss results of the surveys and implications for site improvement.

Riding Library Currents into the Future

When I started the Library Currents project, I wondered what the blog development process would look like if I left no stone unturned. I knew that the social media plan would be an excellent way to do this. The plan works into the future five years, and includes personal investment in networking at conferences and other important activities to grow conversation on the website, such as inviting guest bloggers on Library Currents.

When you learn about and apply the concepts of The Hyperlinked Library, you become an advocate. You turn towards many of the key ideas in this philosophy to develop library service, whether the service is in a building or on a blog. The plan I created holds true to the value of The Hyperlinked Library, from creating conversations about the role of innovations in library service, to avoiding technolust by researching software and doing your homework before going out on that limb. And I do get to play around with new technologies and have some fun, too! With the newly launched Library Currents blog, I feel like I can begin my true work in advocating for participatory library culture.

Mickel Paris

 

Mickel Paris is a third-year MLIS Graduate student at San Jose State University and dreams of world travel. He is the creator of the Library Currents blog and dabbles in web development and social media strategies for Los Angeles area clients. To keep up with his future posts, you can add him on Twitter @librarycurrents

DeLaMare: Making Fun Spaces Work – A TTW Guest Post by Zemirah Lee

A few weeks ago, I wrote about attending a seminar in San Diego put on by the Special Libraries Association. The theme was connecting the dots of creativity and innovation and since we’re on the topic of maker spaces this week, I found my mind repeatedly flashing back to one speaker in particular. Her name was Kathlin L. Ray and she’s the Dean at the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center at the University of Nevada and she represented a really cool space.

Mentioned by the American Libraries Magazine in an article earlier in the year to be one of the top 3 makerspace models that “work”, the Knowledge Center (or DeLaMare as is more affectionately known on campus), was built with this goal in mind: “To create a pioneering information environment designed to nurture creativity and stimulate intellectual inquiry”.

“Recognizing this critical interplay between knowledge and innovation, the U of Nevada, Reno has established one of the first centers in the nation built specifically to embrace these dynamics of the 21st century.” – Steven Zink, VP for IT Dean of Libraries at University of Nevada

Space Redesign: From “Oh” to “WHOAH!”

Kathlin attributes most of the changes to change agent, Tod Colgrove, who transformed the once sleepy library into a modern, collaborative learning environment beginning with relocating the library’s print periodicals and journals to a storage and retrieval facility in the main campus library, which opened up nearly 18,000 square feet in DeLaMare. Colgrove brought in repurposed furniture and computer workstations to expand the space on the cheap.

DeLaMare in 2010

DeLaMare in 2010

The extra room more than quadrupled the computers from 39 to 130. Special whiteboard paint was applied to the walls, which students now use to take notes and exchange ideas.Stephen Abram mentions in his blog that 20% of the library’s walls are covered in IdeaPaint to cover more than 1,000 square feet of floor-to-ceiling workspace on 13 walls of the four-floor library.

Students at play

Students at play

Tables were set up to allow science and engineering students to tinker with analog controllers, electronics kits, and soldering irons and crimpers. The library even checks out kits like robotics. Kathlin’s images of the transformation were stunning. There were neon signs, a production lab, data works, dynamic media. This is a real maker space where people really can experiment and play.

Nontraditional Learning: Bots to quadracopters!

Nontraditional Learning: Bots to quadracopters!

During the redesign, the circulation desk (once an impenetrable fortress) was relocated and literally chopped down to a fragment of its original size. The staff was relocated to public areas to make them more accessible to the community. Old staff offices were reconfigured into group study rooms. What was really interesting was the fact that DeLaMare was the very first academic library to make 3-D printing available to all students and the community. Check out the images of some of the things they’ve printed, and look at the fun they’re having with it.

3D Images

3D Images

Prior to the redesign, hourly headcounts of students in the library were at about 24. Now it’s closer to 200 on any daily basis, and nearly double that during midterms and finals weeks. DeLaMare focuses on co-creation, not consumption but collaboration. Librarians there want you to think of it as a “knowledge center” and NOT a library. Imagine that.

Collaboration, Discussion & Engagement

Tod Colgrove, speaks at TEDxReno on the topic of how can libraries of the present be influenced by those of the past. Check out this video where he talks about images of the Great Library at Alexandria—where you see more people than books in the space. People engaging in conversation is at the heart of where knowledge happens, NOT in the dusty scrolls. What a striking image when talking about libraries as places where knowledge happens through community, not simply library space—as repository for books.

To some, librarians seem so afraid of change and trying new things because we make it our profession to know where to find answers. We are the go-to-people if you need-to-know. But sometimes… just sometimes… it’s OK to try a few new things and here’s an example of a library that was willing to do just that in favoring the students over the collection and look at the fun they’re having.

References:

American Library Association. (2013, February 6). Manufacturing makerspaces. American Libraries Magazine. Retrieved fromhttp://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/manufacturing-makerspaces

Colegrove, T. (2013, June). Libraries of the Future: Tod Colegrove at TEDxReno [Video File]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvE0gHhK3ss&feature=youtu.be

Ray, K.L. (2013, October 4). Knowledge creation and the expanding role of the 21st century library. Connecting the Dots of Creative Innovation. Symposium conducted at the meeting of Special Libraries Association: San Diego Chapter, San Diego, California.

Zurier, S. (2013, May 8). College libraries transition to high-tech learning centers. EdTech Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2013/05/college-libraries-transition-high-tech-learning-centers

Zemirah Lee 2013Zemirah Lee is a graduate student at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science, graduating in May 2014. She also works as a Project Manager on an IMLS grant-funded research project studying young adult spaces in public libraries. Zem lives in San Diego, California with her husband and three children.

News: SJSU SLIS Receives Sloan-C Award Honoring Innovation in Online Learning

The School of Library and Information Science at San José State University (SJSU) is the recipient of a 2013 Sloan Consortium Effective Practice Award, honoring innovation in online education.  The award recognizes the school’s effective use of the Sloan-C Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Education Programs, which the school uses to measure the quality of its fully online graduate programs. The award also acknowledges the school’s efforts to share results transparently with all stakeholders by posting scorecard results on the school’s website. The SJSU information school conducts annual assessments using the scorecard’s research-based standards and indicators. During the most recent assessment, the scorecard total was 196, a number that is categorized in the “exemplary” range by the Sloan Consortium.

See more at: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/about-slis/news/detail/sjsu-slis-receives-sloan-c-award-honoring-innovation-online-learning

More on “23 Things for SLIS Students and Alumni”

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/about-slis/news/detail/new-resource-explores-23-online-tools-help-information-professionals

Learning new technology can be challenging. With that in mind, SLISConnect, the combined student and alumni association at the SJSU information school, recently developed an online resource aimed at helping students and alumni explore tools that can foster academic and professional success. Launched in July, 23 Things for SLIS Students and Alumni: Essential Tools for Professional Success explores 23 online tools, with tutorials that take between 20 and 30 minutes each to complete. Topics include time management tools, presentation tools, screencast software, career resources, and social networking sites. Five modules are already available, and the SLISConnect team plans to add other modules in the months ahead. 

Click through to read the whole article.

23 Things for SLIS Students & Alumni – New Learning 2.0 Initiative at SJSU SLIS

23logocrop

https://23things.sjsu.edu

SLISConnect, SJSU’s School of Library & Information Science student and alumni group, is excited to announce the launch of 23 Things for SLIS Students & Alumni: Essentials Skills for Professional Success. This Learning 2.0 program will offer 23 weekly modules (one module per week) to introduce specific online technologies that are proven and recommended by SLIS students and alumni for academic and professional success. Created by SLIS students and alumni for SLIS students and alumni, this unique program, in addition to exploring valuable online tools, creates and fosters connections among a community of professionals committed to lifelong and collaborative learning. With three target audience groups, 23 Things will be broken down into 3 segments: New LIS Students, Professional Development and Presentations (focused on current students), and the New LIS Professional. Each segment will entail seven to eight modules that will include exercises to demonstrate learning and digital badges will be awarded to those who demonstrate module completion. The program has already attracted over 30 student and alumni volunteers who will participate as site administrators, module builders, module reviewers,  module correspondents, and bloggers.

How does HGH Energizer work and where to get HGH pills?

SLISConnect hosted a Kick Off Session on July 10th where participants were able to learn more about the program, how they can participate, offer ideas for upcoming modules, and participate a Q&A session. Suggestions poured in for the program include having live sessions where module participants can share how they used the technologies and resources presented and expanding the asynchronous module format into a more engaging and collaborative learning experience. Additional ideas were also presented to include modules for MARA students, mobile technologies, dealing with diversity issues, and more. One participant even asked “Why 23 Things?”. Project Manager Elaine Hall responded that the program was an adoption of the original 23 Things program developed by Helene Blowers but further emphasized with that with evident enthusiasm of this program and the suggestions already submitted, there is convicting evidence that the program will expand well beyond 23 things.

Note from Michael: I am thrilled to see our students run with this idea. The image above is one of the badges participants receive for completing a module. Watch the Kick Off Session video for more about this program.

Being Yourself

Nice post by recent SLIS grad Lisa Hubbell about the interview process at the Two Librarians and a Blog blog:

http://twolibrariansandablog.wordpress.com/2013/05/10/being-yourself/

The last assignment for library school is complete, and I am waiting for graduation ceremonies in a week, and a diploma in the mail in the coming months. I am applying for jobs, as I have for some time, but now paying more attention to advice about interview questions and resumes.

When I hear something two or three times in the same week, I tend to take it as a lesson. I heard one question raised by other students, both in my final class meeting and in a Career Center webinar: Should I be myself in a job interview? It’s so easy to get trapped in second-guessing what the hiring committee is looking for, trying to fit into the right mold to be the one they will want. But professor Aaron Schmidt and SJSU SLIS Career CenterLiaison Jill Klees were both very clear on this

  • Yes, be yourself.
  • You’re interviewing them too.
  • You need to find out if this is a job you can live with and even love.
  • If they can’t tell who you are, you might end up miserable in the wrong job.

Click through to read the rest.

CIRI: MOOC Meets Learning 2.0

This post was originally published at the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI)  blog at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science in May 2013.

Please add our blog to your reader for ongoing articles on research and innovation from the SLIS faculty: http://slisapps.sjsu.edu/blogs/wp/ciri/

MOOC Meets Learning 2.0 

In Fall 2013, the SJSU School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will be offering its first open online course, the Hyperlinked Library MOOC. It is adapted from an existing online graduate course offered to SJSU students enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program, and is intended to serve as a professional development opportunity for librarians, library staff, and professionals who work in archives and other types of information centers. The SLIS MOOC will be free and will not be offered for academic credit.  It will run from September to November, and will explore how libraries are using emerging technologies to serve their communities. I will be co-teaching with SLIS Lecturer Kyle Jones, along with course assistants, who will be SLIS graduate students.  The MOOC will run on the open-source blogging platform WordPress enhanced with a suite of plug-ins called BuddyPress.

Up to 400 MOOC students will have the opportunity to explore the Hyperlinked Library model through recorded presentations and other content, as well as practical assignments that encourage students to apply what they are learning. Badges will be awarded as students move through the course, culminating with a certificate of completion.

Although educators and scholars are debating the advantages and downsides of MOOCs, with many asserting that MOOCs have the potential to provide new insight regarding online learning, research regarding MOOCs is in its infancy.  A recent study by The Chronicle of Higher Education found that 79% of MOOC instructors believe MOOCs are “worth the hype” (Kolowich, 2013). John Daniel’s 2012 paper Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility explores emerging issues that educators should consider and scholars should research: technology platforms, for-profit versus nonprofit models, effective pedagogy, and student success within large learning environments. A scan of recent research includes assessing the experiences of students and professors in MOOC environments, and evaluating various MOOC platforms and their impact on student learning. Clearly, evaluating MOOC environments is an area ripe for exploration.

The parallels between the MOOC movement and 23 Things/ Learning 2.0 programs, my research area for the past few years, are intriguing. Might we argue that Learning 2.0 (L2.0) programs, offered in hundreds if not thousands of organizations, are precursors to the evolving, open and large scale learning landscape we’re experiencing now?

The #hyperlib MOOC will incorporate certain emphases culled from my L2.0 research. The L2.0 model has an emphasis on play, experimentation and social interaction with other learners as part of the program. A focus on play, innovation and experimentation is needed for 21st century learning success, argue Thomas and Brown in a New Culture of Learning. Jenkins defined play as “the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving,” and argued that play is one of the most important emerging social literacies and valued skills for the changing landscape of education. The L2.0 model combines play and opportunities to explore new technologies into a unique self-directed yet social learning experience.

The MOOC will also based on the concepts of “connected learning,” a term used by Jenkins (2012) to describe participatory online learning with a real-world focus: “It’s social. It’s hands-on. It’s active. It’s networked. It’s personal. It’s effective. Through a new vision of learning, it holds out the possibility for productive and broad-based educational change.”

Research centered on delivering the #hyperlib MOOC will contribute to a better understanding regarding how not-for-credit MOOCs can serve as professional development tools.  I am eager to evaluate the SLIS MOOC, identify areas where the model is effective, and provide recommendations regarding how to improve the design of MOOCs in the future.

References

Daniel, J. (2012). Making sense of MOOCs: Musings in a maze of myth, paradox and possibility.

Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JIME). Retrieved from http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/view/2012-18

Jenkins, H. (March 1, 2012). Connected learning: A new paradigm [Web log post].    http://henryjenkins.org/2012/03/connected_learning_a_new_parad.html

Kolowich, S. (2013, March 18). The minds behind the MOOCs.  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/The-Professors-Behind-the-MOOC/137905/?cid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en#id=overview

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Lexington, Ky: CreateSpace?.

 

Updated Bio for SLIS

Dr. Michael Stephens received his PhD in information science in 2007 from the University of North Texas via an IMLS fellowship. His teaching focuses on user-centered services and outreach with technology, and learning programs in library settings.

His recent publications include the co-authored article “Benefits and results of Learning 2.0: a case study of CityLibrariesLearning – discover*play*connect” in Australian Library Journal, and “The Impact and effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian public libraries” in Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. He currently writes the monthly column “Office Hours” in Library Journal exploring issues, ideas and emerging trends in library and information science education. He is currently serving as the Project Director for the Salzburg Curriculum initiative, funded by IMLS and Salzburg Global Seminar. The project focuses on updating LIS and museum professional education in an era of particitory culture.

Stephens has spoken about emerging technologies, innovation, and libraries to audiences in over 27 states and in nine countries, including a research tour of Australia and presentations for the US embassies in Germany and Turkey. He recently delivered keynote addresses for library consortia in Alberta, Canada and northwest Ohio.