Category Archives: SJSU SLIS

More on “23 Things for SLIS Students and Alumni”

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/about-slis/news/detail/new-resource-explores-23-online-tools-help-information-professionals

Learning new technology can be challenging. With that in mind, SLISConnect, the combined student and alumni association at the SJSU information school, recently developed an online resource aimed at helping students and alumni explore tools that can foster academic and professional success. Launched in July, 23 Things for SLIS Students and Alumni: Essential Tools for Professional Success explores 23 online tools, with tutorials that take between 20 and 30 minutes each to complete. Topics include time management tools, presentation tools, screencast software, career resources, and social networking sites. Five modules are already available, and the SLISConnect team plans to add other modules in the months ahead. 

Click through to read the whole article.

23 Things for SLIS Students & Alumni – New Learning 2.0 Initiative at SJSU SLIS

23logocrop

https://23things.sjsu.edu

SLISConnect, SJSU’s School of Library & Information Science student and alumni group, is excited to announce the launch of 23 Things for SLIS Students & Alumni: Essentials Skills for Professional Success. This Learning 2.0 program will offer 23 weekly modules (one module per week) to introduce specific online technologies that are proven and recommended by SLIS students and alumni for academic and professional success. Created by SLIS students and alumni for SLIS students and alumni, this unique program, in addition to exploring valuable online tools, creates and fosters connections among a community of professionals committed to lifelong and collaborative learning. With three target audience groups, 23 Things will be broken down into 3 segments: New LIS Students, Professional Development and Presentations (focused on current students), and the New LIS Professional. Each segment will entail seven to eight modules that will include exercises to demonstrate learning and digital badges will be awarded to those who demonstrate module completion. The program has already attracted over 30 student and alumni volunteers who will participate as site administrators, module builders, module reviewers,  module correspondents, and bloggers.

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SLISConnect hosted a Kick Off Session on July 10th where participants were able to learn more about the program, how they can participate, offer ideas for upcoming modules, and participate a Q&A session. Suggestions poured in for the program include having live sessions where module participants can share how they used the technologies and resources presented and expanding the asynchronous module format into a more engaging and collaborative learning experience. Additional ideas were also presented to include modules for MARA students, mobile technologies, dealing with diversity issues, and more. One participant even asked “Why 23 Things?”. Project Manager Elaine Hall responded that the program was an adoption of the original 23 Things program developed by Helene Blowers but further emphasized with that with evident enthusiasm of this program and the suggestions already submitted, there is convicting evidence that the program will expand well beyond 23 things.

Note from Michael: I am thrilled to see our students run with this idea. The image above is one of the badges participants receive for completing a module. Watch the Kick Off Session video for more about this program.

Being Yourself

Nice post by recent SLIS grad Lisa Hubbell about the interview process at the Two Librarians and a Blog blog:

http://twolibrariansandablog.wordpress.com/2013/05/10/being-yourself/

The last assignment for library school is complete, and I am waiting for graduation ceremonies in a week, and a diploma in the mail in the coming months. I am applying for jobs, as I have for some time, but now paying more attention to advice about interview questions and resumes.

When I hear something two or three times in the same week, I tend to take it as a lesson. I heard one question raised by other students, both in my final class meeting and in a Career Center webinar: Should I be myself in a job interview? It’s so easy to get trapped in second-guessing what the hiring committee is looking for, trying to fit into the right mold to be the one they will want. But professor Aaron Schmidt and SJSU SLIS Career CenterLiaison Jill Klees were both very clear on this

  • Yes, be yourself.
  • You’re interviewing them too.
  • You need to find out if this is a job you can live with and even love.
  • If they can’t tell who you are, you might end up miserable in the wrong job.

Click through to read the rest.

CIRI: MOOC Meets Learning 2.0

This post was originally published at the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI)  blog at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science in May 2013.

Please add our blog to your reader for ongoing articles on research and innovation from the SLIS faculty: http://slisapps.sjsu.edu/blogs/wp/ciri/

MOOC Meets Learning 2.0 

In Fall 2013, the SJSU School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will be offering its first open online course, the Hyperlinked Library MOOC. It is adapted from an existing online graduate course offered to SJSU students enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program, and is intended to serve as a professional development opportunity for librarians, library staff, and professionals who work in archives and other types of information centers. The SLIS MOOC will be free and will not be offered for academic credit.  It will run from September to November, and will explore how libraries are using emerging technologies to serve their communities. I will be co-teaching with SLIS Lecturer Kyle Jones, along with course assistants, who will be SLIS graduate students.  The MOOC will run on the open-source blogging platform WordPress enhanced with a suite of plug-ins called BuddyPress.

Up to 400 MOOC students will have the opportunity to explore the Hyperlinked Library model through recorded presentations and other content, as well as practical assignments that encourage students to apply what they are learning. Badges will be awarded as students move through the course, culminating with a certificate of completion.

Although educators and scholars are debating the advantages and downsides of MOOCs, with many asserting that MOOCs have the potential to provide new insight regarding online learning, research regarding MOOCs is in its infancy.  A recent study by The Chronicle of Higher Education found that 79% of MOOC instructors believe MOOCs are “worth the hype” (Kolowich, 2013). John Daniel’s 2012 paper Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility explores emerging issues that educators should consider and scholars should research: technology platforms, for-profit versus nonprofit models, effective pedagogy, and student success within large learning environments. A scan of recent research includes assessing the experiences of students and professors in MOOC environments, and evaluating various MOOC platforms and their impact on student learning. Clearly, evaluating MOOC environments is an area ripe for exploration.

The parallels between the MOOC movement and 23 Things/ Learning 2.0 programs, my research area for the past few years, are intriguing. Might we argue that Learning 2.0 (L2.0) programs, offered in hundreds if not thousands of organizations, are precursors to the evolving, open and large scale learning landscape we’re experiencing now?

The #hyperlib MOOC will incorporate certain emphases culled from my L2.0 research. The L2.0 model has an emphasis on play, experimentation and social interaction with other learners as part of the program. A focus on play, innovation and experimentation is needed for 21st century learning success, argue Thomas and Brown in a New Culture of Learning. Jenkins defined play as “the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving,” and argued that play is one of the most important emerging social literacies and valued skills for the changing landscape of education. The L2.0 model combines play and opportunities to explore new technologies into a unique self-directed yet social learning experience.

The MOOC will also based on the concepts of “connected learning,” a term used by Jenkins (2012) to describe participatory online learning with a real-world focus: “It’s social. It’s hands-on. It’s active. It’s networked. It’s personal. It’s effective. Through a new vision of learning, it holds out the possibility for productive and broad-based educational change.”

Research centered on delivering the #hyperlib MOOC will contribute to a better understanding regarding how not-for-credit MOOCs can serve as professional development tools.  I am eager to evaluate the SLIS MOOC, identify areas where the model is effective, and provide recommendations regarding how to improve the design of MOOCs in the future.

References

Daniel, J. (2012). Making sense of MOOCs: Musings in a maze of myth, paradox and possibility.

Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JIME). Retrieved from http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/view/2012-18

Jenkins, H. (March 1, 2012). Connected learning: A new paradigm [Web log post].    http://henryjenkins.org/2012/03/connected_learning_a_new_parad.html

Kolowich, S. (2013, March 18). The minds behind the MOOCs.  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/The-Professors-Behind-the-MOOC/137905/?cid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en#id=overview

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Lexington, Ky: CreateSpace?.

 

Updated Bio for SLIS

Dr. Michael Stephens received his PhD in information science in 2007 from the University of North Texas via an IMLS fellowship. His teaching focuses on user-centered services and outreach with technology, and learning programs in library settings.

His recent publications include the co-authored article “Benefits and results of Learning 2.0: a case study of CityLibrariesLearning – discover*play*connect” in Australian Library Journal, and “The Impact and effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian public libraries” in Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. He currently writes the monthly column “Office Hours” in Library Journal exploring issues, ideas and emerging trends in library and information science education. He is currently serving as the Project Director for the Salzburg Curriculum initiative, funded by IMLS and Salzburg Global Seminar. The project focuses on updating LIS and museum professional education in an era of particitory culture.

Stephens has spoken about emerging technologies, innovation, and libraries to audiences in over 27 states and in nine countries, including a research tour of Australia and presentations for the US embassies in Germany and Turkey. He recently delivered keynote addresses for library consortia in Alberta, Canada and northwest Ohio.

SJSU SLIS CIRI: New Post – MOOC Meets Learning 2.0

I have a new post up at the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI)  blog at the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science:

http://slisapps.sjsu.edu/blogs/wp/ciri/2013/05/11/mooc-meets-learning-2-0-by-dr-michael-stephens/

Although educators and scholars are debating the advantages and downsides of MOOCs, with many asserting that MOOCs have the potential to provide new insight regarding online learning, research regarding MOOCs is in its infancy.  A recent study by The Chronicle of Higher Education found that 79% of MOOC instructors believe MOOCs are “worth the hype” (Kolowich, 2013). John Daniel’s 2012 paper Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox and Possibility explores emerging issues that educators should consider and scholars should research: technology platforms, for-profit versus nonprofit models, effective pedagogy, and student success within large learning environments. A scan of recent research includes assessing the experiences of students and professors in MOOC environments, and evaluating various MOOC platforms and their impact on student learning. Clearly, evaluating MOOC environments is an area ripe for exploration.

The parallels between the MOOC movement and 23 Things/ Learning 2.0 programs, my research area for the past few years, are intriguing. Might we argue that Learning 2.0 (L2.0) programs, offered in hundreds if not thousands of organizations, are precursors to the evolving, open and large scale learning landscape we’re experiencing now?

Read the whole post at CIRI!

Developing My Personal Learning Network: Processes, Decisions and Outcomes – A TTW Guest Post by Elaine Hall

Personal Learning Network – Presentation

“Developing”, as it pertains to my title of this blog, is defined as the ongoing development, utilization, and management of my personal learning network. It is not something that “is done” and then complete, it is something that will, with careful nurturing and management, follow me throughout the rest my learning life.

The journey began years ago without realization when I signed up for Facebook, popped on (and then quickly off) Twitter, set up a LinkedIn account, and checked out various apps via my mobile phone.  It wasn’t until taking Transformative Learning and Technology Literacy course with Dr. Michael Stephens that the potential of a Personal Learning Network (PLN) came to life!

My favorite explanation of a Personal Learning Network is by Anya Kamenetz who writes on her blog post titled 8 Ways to Build Your Personal Learning Network with Twitter, Google Plus, and More  that “no one learns alone”. The leads to the various discussions about transformative learning we have had in our course this semester – where learning is a transformative process from where we begin in our learning, to how where we end, and most importantly – the resources, tools, and people that helped us through that transformation. David Hopkins (2013) highlights this well in his own blog post when he said “I know my work and perception of my role has been transformed since I joined Twitter and other networks, and it has been because I wanted it to.” That’s the beauty of the PLN – we create it purposely so our learning can be transformed, so we can continuously expand and explore our understanding, and then share that understanding continuously with others.

In the attached “My Personal Learning Network” presentation, I present my PLN as it stands right now. As will always be the case, the network is not yet complete. For example, I have not yet explored or compared bookmarking sites, yet they are on my list of things to check out.  I need to revisit other LIS type social sites such as Goodreads and LibraryThing, both which I have explored before, to see if they should be added as well. And there are so many others. What news feeds will help support my PLN? What list serves should I explore?  What professional associations should I engage with online? What potential employers should I follow?  The process will be ongoing.

VIEW “MY PERSONAL LEARNING NETWORK” PRESENTATION VIA SLIDESHARE!: 

For those of you who do not have the time to view my presentation, I offer an outline below of my PLN development process.

My PLN Mission Statement: 

My PLN will…

  • be transparent and open for others to view, to participate, and to learn from
  • foster lifelong learning for myself and others
  • permit both creativity and curiosity
  • be used to share ideas, to play, to have fun, and to continuously explore.

Goals of My PLN: 

  • Commit to lifelong learning
  • Constantly add to my skillset
  • Develop professional identity
  • Curate information
  • Find a mentor – be a mentor
  • Foster balance between professional and personal life

Scope of MY PLN:

The scope of my PLN is to focus on issues and trends relating to academic librarianship and will include a strong focus on the following areas:

  • Academic Libraries
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Technology
  • Research Methodology
  • Reference Services
  • Online Learning
  • Assessment
  • Learning Environments
  • Social/Hyperlinked Media

Objectives: 

  • Connect
  • Contribute
  • Converse
  • Request

My Primary Networks: 

  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Netvibes

My PLN Tools: 

  • Google Docs
  • Box.net
  • Slideshare
  • Mindmeister
  • Google Scholar
  • Flickr
  • Tumblr
  • YouTube

Maintaining My PLN: 

  • Contribute at least one blog post per week
  • Participate in at least 3 discussions per week
  • Connect/follow those I meet in discussions
  • Tweet and re-tweet daily
  • Connect by sharing personal interests as well as professional interests
  • Re-evaluate dashboards and collections at each life milestone
  • Review blogs every six months – weed out inactive ones
  • Network at live events, receptions, conferences
  • Introduce others within my network and ask to be introduced

Advice to Others 

BE PATIENT! 

  • Building a PLN doesn’t happen quickly
  • It takes time to make connections
  • It takes time to build relationships
  • It takes participation to determine the value of a community
  • It takes perseverance when you receive no comments or replies
  • It requires patience to build your social presence

BE AUTHENTIC! 

“Don’t try to game the system, worry too much about your online “brand,” or in any way cajole people into following you or responding to you. The more you reveal your humanity the more people will trust you, identify with you, and respond to your reflections and appeals. More importantly, the more you seek out the humanity in others, the more they will want to connect with you – and share with you.”    Wagner, 2012

PLN Success! 

The following items are examples of outcomes as a result of developing my personal learning network. These results happened naturally as I explored the potential of my PLN: what I wanted it to do, how I wanted to use it, how it could build my personal and professional networks, and how to not only participate in but also build community. It is evident by the immediacy of the results, that my PLN has only begun its potential as an essential tool to lifelong learning.

ACTION: Used Pinterest to do a search on PLN’s. Received numerous resources, suggestions, presentations, mindmap, etc. to reflect upon for my own PLN development.

RESULT: This led to developing my own Pinterest PLN board which has since been followed by others

ACTION: Inquired about favorite tools and resources from graduate students in a MLIS program via Facebook SLIS Students group

RESULT: over 13 responses with over unique 20 suggestions. Not only resulted as a tremendous resource for my project, but also resulted in shared file for future students to access the recommendations. 

Resources supporting both this blog post and the “My Personal Learning Network” presentation: 

Hopkins, S. (2013). Developing your own Personal Learning Network (PLN) #edtech. Technology Enhanced Learning Blog. Retrieved from: http://www.dontwasteyourtime.co.uk/elearning/developing-your-own-personal-learning-network

Inquisitive Learning: http://inquisitivelearning.wordpress.com

Howlett, A. (2011). Connecting to the LIS online community: A new information professional developing a personal learning network. ALIA 5th New Librarians Symposium 2011: Metamorphosis: What will you become today. Perth, Australia.

Kamenetz, Anya (2011). 8 Ways to build your personal learning network with Twitter, Google Plus, and more. Fast Company. Retrieved at: http://www.fastcompany.com/1770997/8-ways-build-your-personal-learning-network-twitter-google-plus-and-more

Rajagopal, Kamakshi, Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée, Van Bruggen, Jan, And Sloep, Peter. “Understanding personal learning networks: Their structure, content and the networking skills needed to optimally use them” First Monday [Online],  17(1). Retrieved from:  http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/3559/3131

Wagner, D. (2013). Personal Education Networks for Educators. Getting Smart. Retrieved from: http://gettingsmart.com/2012/01/personal-learning-networks-for-educators-10-tips/

 

elaineElaine Hall is a MLIS student at San Jose State University studying and working in the field of Library and Information Science with special focus on research, academic libraries, and information technology.

#transtech Learning 2.0 Programs this Semester

In my Library Journal column “Office Hours,” I explored the concept of learning everywhere.  Here’s a snip:

This semester, I’m teaching a new class based on Mezirow’s concepts of transformative learning, the work of Char Booth in the arena of user instruction, and the Learning 2.0 model…. We’re working with consultant Polly-Alida Farrington, who teamed up three groups of my students with two libraries and a school library consortium in New York State. Over the course of our 15-week semester, each group is adapting, designing, and running a “mini-23 Things” for its assigned organization.

It’s been a fun, chaotic, and messy experience. In our weekly group chats online, the mantra has become “Learn by doing….” Real-world messiness offers a level of experience unmatched by classroom activities. This high-tech/high-touch experience sets the students on course for getting jobs and taking on future projects.

Well, the learning continues with the third semester I’ve taught #transtech. We’ve partnered with some great libraries this spring. The students share a link and a blurb about their programs below:

East Greenbush Community Library

This site is for the staff of East Greenbush Community Library in Albany, NY. The library came to us with a specific list of emerging technology tools that they were interested in learning about. From this we have developed an 8 week curriculum. As an added bonus, East Greenbush will be offering continuing education credits to participating staff members. We have 23 participants.
Washington University Library in St. Louis
http://learninghub2point0.wordpress.com

The Learning Hub 2.0 site was created for librarians at Washington University in St. Louis in the spring 2013. These librarians submitted a list of requested emergent technologies that they were interested in exploring.  Our student group then created 7 learning modules including: Web Marketing, Data Gathering, Online Instruction, eBook Management, Online Chat, Online Collections, and Data Visualization. The participant librarians at WUSL have been exploring these emergent tools and exploring how they can be useful in their institution.

Huntington Beach Public Library

Family Literacy Program

The “Links to Literacy” Learning 2.0 program is designed for use by library staff, tutors, and the diverse community at the Huntington Beach Public Library. We have created 7 modules targeted for this diverse community – many whom have limited education, limited access to computers, speak English as a second language, and need to develop computer skills such as setting up emails, using a search engine, finding and applying for jobs online, and connecting socially. The program has been utilized by patrons with the assistance of tutors who also teach English as a second language. Most fascinating, in addition to learning about the 7 modules, these patrons are opting to perform (ie set up email and corresponding in English) these modules in English extending their overall educational experience.

 

All of the learning modules will be archived at our Learning 2.0 module site by the end of the term: http://thehyperlinkedlibrary.org/learning20/

News: The Hyperlinked Library MOOC Fall 2013 Announced

hyperlibMOOCNote from Michael: I am very excited about this project! We’ll be offering a professional development opportunity for FREE to a global audience AND I’ll be co-teaching with Kyle Jones! Thanks to SJSU SLIS for the incredible support and encouragement for this endeavor!

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/about-slis/news/detail/free-online-course-extends-learning-individuals-across-globe

In an effort to share insight regarding some of the latest trends in the information profession with individuals from across the globe, the San José State University School of Library and Information Science (SJSU SLIS) will be offering a massive open online course (MOOC) in the fall.

The open online course will bring individuals from diverse backgrounds and geographic regions together in an interactive online learning environment. SJSU SLIS award-winning instructors will spearhead this professional development opportunity. The MOOC is available to the public for free, and anyone can register. MOOC students will not receive college credit.

The information school’s first open online course, the Hyperlinked Library MOOC, will begin September 3, 2013, and it explores how libraries are using emerging technologies to serve their communities.

The MOOC parallels content offered in a Hyperlinked Library Seminar taught by assistant professor Dr. Michael Stephens in the fully online Master of Library and Information Science(MLIS) program and fully online Post-Master’s Certificate program at the San José State University School of Library and Information Science. Stephens and SJSU SLIS lecturer Kyle Jones, along with course assistants, will be the instructors for the Hyperlinked Library MOOC.

Stephens has spoken about emerging technologies, innovation, and libraries to audiences in more than 27 states and eight countries, including a research tour of Australia and presentations for the U.S. embassies in Germany and Turkey. He has authored numerous articles, and he currently writes the monthly column “Office Hours” in Library Journal magazine, exploring issues, ideas and emerging trends in library and information science education.

Jones is a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and teaches on topics related to digital tools, trends, and controversies. He is the author of several publications, including a book chapter in “The LIS Professional Commons and the Online Networked Practitioner” with Stephens.

The term “Hyperlinked Library” describes how our connected world is transforming 21stCentury libraries into participatory, playful, and user-centered spaces while upholding traditional values. It encompasses both physical and virtual space, as well as many types of libraries.

For example, during the 2009 Australian School Library Association conference in Perth, Stephens presented the Hyperlinked Library model to teacher librarians. “School librarians could use the model to extend support for learning beyond the walls of the school library and engage with students, teachers and administrators in an open, transparent manner wherever the learning takes place,” wrote Stephens in his Hyperlinked Library TTW whitepaper.

He further explained, “Hyperlinked library services are born from careful trend-spotting, an application of the foundational tenets of librarianship and an informed understanding of emerging technologies? societal and cultural impact.”

More information about the Hyperlinked Library:

MOOC students will have the opportunity to explore the Hyperlinked Library model through recorded presentations and other content, as well as practical assignments that encourage students to apply what they are learning. For example, students will expand their learning by developing an emerging technologies plan and social media policy. Badges will be awarded as students move through the course, culminating with a certificate of completion.

Stephens developed and created the Hyperlinked Library course over the last few years, drawing on experiences working with libraries located across North America and internationally, including Germany, Australia, Turkey, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. He will pull in global experts and resources as part of the Hyperlinked Library MOOC learning experience.

Individuals interested in registering for the Hyperlinked Library MOOC are encouraged to immediately sign up for the course. An interest list is currently being formed, and the first 400 individuals to sign up will have priority registration.

More on the #hyperlibMOOC from Kyle Jones

Please don’t miss:

http://thecorkboard.org/stephens-and-jones-to-co-teach-a-mooc-version-of-the-hyperlinked-library/

A snippet:

There are a number of reasons this project excites me, and I think it should excite you as a potential student:

  1. The Hyperlinked Library model takes a humanist approach to user services and their intersection with ICTs: this is not a technology course, but it is a critical examination of the dual shaping of LIS professionals and technologies as they work in tandem to serve library users;
  2. Both Michael and I believe in a constructionist approach to learning: this is not a consumption course where the lecture is a vade mecum to hold onto closely.  A lecture is only a piece of the learning experience that, in our mind, serves as a foundation for exploration, critical examination, and–most importantly–as the base on which other artifacts are created.  As such, the course will be designed in order for students to learn from each other and develop useful products that can inform their daily practices;
  3. The learning management system is a walled garden which restricts the participatory aims of our teaching and denies students the opportunity to share their work and experiences with the world.  Using WordPress and a combination of plugins, we’ve been teaching our courses using a blog-based social course system that we’ve developed over a number of years.  This system has proven its efficacy time and time again, and reviews from students in their own posts and our course reviews indicate that learning online in an organic social environment has distinct advantages over structured, both in power and in content, learning management systems.  We’re excited to create a brand new iteration of our system and to scale it for hundreds of users.

On this last point, I will be leading a cohort of students this summer to build the site.  Students will support in the research, development, and deployment of the MOOC.  Activities will include: gathering research materials on topics related to MOOCs; participating in the construction of the course site by helping with elements of content strategy and management, information architecture, user experience testing, gamificiation, and design; developing a knowledge base and self-paced instructional materials (e.g., screencasts); and assisting in the instructional design of the teaching and learning experience.  I’ve already received a number of inquiries from students about this opportunity and I’m excited to meet them come June.