Category Archives: SJSU SLIS

My Courses in WISE

I am happy to announce both of my fall  2012 courses will be available in the WISE program:

 Web-based  Information Science Education (WISE) is a unique and groundbreaking opportunity in online Library and Information Science (LIS) Education.

Leading schools in the information field have extended their reach outside the traditional classroom to broaden the educational opportunities available to their students. The WISE Consortium uses advanced technology as a means to enrich LIS education and foster relationships among students, faculty, and universities, through course sharing an cooperative pedagogical training.

The vision of this initiative is to provide a collaborative, cost-effective distance education model that will increase quality, access, and diversity of online education opportunities in Library and Information Science.

Transformative Learning: http://wiseeducation.org/classinfo.aspx?classid=972

The Hyperlinked Library: http://wiseeducation.org/classinfo.aspx?classid=962

Transformative Learning and Technology Literacies – Updated for Fall 2012

Course Description

All information professionals will most probably be called upon to create or present some form of instruction in the scope of their jobs. Within information environments, this class explores models such as Mezirow’s concept of transformative learning, the USER model, and the Learning 2.0/23 Things program as well as developing concepts such as Jenkins’ transmedia navigation. Coursework answers these questions:

  • How can we promote transformative learning via technology?
  • How can we design instructional experiences that have high value for library learners?
  • What emergent technologies are enhancing the way we learn and navigate information?
  • How can Learning 2.0 learning programs enhance staff devlopment?
  • How can Personal Learning Networks (PLNs) enhance professional practice?

Course Prerequisites: LIBR 200, 202, 204 required. Other prerequisites may be added depending on content.

Course Requirements

Assignments:

  • All assignments support Learning Outcome #1 in addition to other SLOs.
  • Reflection Blogging: Eight 200 word minimum blog posts will serve as a reflection journal for the modules included in our course content. 20 points
  • Learning 2.0/23 Things Adaptation & Implementation: In groups, students will adapt and create content for a Learning 2.0 program and implement the program for a  library setting. Adaptation: 20 points, Implementation: 20 points
  • Online Personal Learning Network:  Students will design and curate their own online personal learning network throughout the semester. A media presentation or written report and resource list will share the details of the network. 20 points
  • Context Book Reports: Students will read one book selected from a list provided, and write a 400 word reflection or create a media-based presentation relating the topic and focus of the book to transformative learning and new literacies. 10 points
  • Participation & Seminar Engagement: Students will interact weekly via the course learning community, various social tools, and via optional online meetings. Students will be actively reading and commenting on others’ blog posts as well as within the learning programs they’ve designed. A final reflection post will allow students to self-evaluate their participation and engagement. 10 points

Detailed information and rubrics will be available on the course community site. Students will utilize a WordPress-based community course site for blogging, sharing and interaction throughout the course.

Course Calendar
Dates  and topics subject to change.

  • Week 1 – Course Introduction / Readings
  • Week 2 – L2.0 Prep / Learning & Instruction Theory
  • Week 3 – L2.0 Prep / Transformative Learning
  • Week 4 – L2.0 Prep / Teaching Tech
  • Week 5 – L2.0 Prep /  The USER Method
  • Week 6 – L2.0 Prep
  • Week 7 – L2.0 Launch for all groups
  • Week 8 – L2.0 / Personal Learning Networks (PLNs)
  • Week 9 – L2.0 / PLNS 2
  • Week 10 – L2.0 / PLNs: Exploration
  • Week 11 – L2.0 / Trans Media Navigation & Digital Storytelling
  • Week 12 – L2.0 / Games & Learning
  • Week 13 – L2.0 / Learning Analytics
  • Week 14 – L2.0 Course Wrap Up / PLN Presentations or Reports
  • Week 15 – Flex Time / Course Reflections & Wrap Up

Course Grading
Grading will be based on 100 possible points. More information to come as assignments are finalized.

  • Late assignments will lose 10% of point value per day late.
  • If life circumstances require students to request an extension, please do so several days before the assignment is due.
  • Communication and interaction throughout the semester via the course site is expected.

Textbooks and Readings

Readings and other media for each course concept will be  posted on the course site. Students are encouraged to share articles, blog posts and sites they find with the class via their blogs.

Course Prerequisites

LIBR 200LIBR 202LIBR 204Other prerequisites may be added depending on content.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize models of engaged, technology-based learning within information positions of all kinds.
  2. Explain how new types of literacies impact the way we learn and consume information.
  3. Create a Web-based model of a user-focused, high value learning program.
  4. Utilize a personal learning network to enhance future professional practice.
  5. Engage learners within all information environments.
  6. Create and edit content for the Read/Write Web via various social technologies.

Core Competencies

LIBR 281 supports the following core competencies:

  1. C Recognize and describe cultural and economic diversity in the clientele of libraries or information organizations.
  2. H Demonstrate proficiency in identifying, using, and evaluating current and emerging information and communication technologies.
  3. I Use service concepts, principles, and techniques to connect individuals or groups with accurate, relevant, and appropriate information.

Textbooks

Required Textbooks:

  • Booth, C. (2011). Reflective teaching, Effective learning: Instructional literacy for library educators. Chicago: ALA. Available through Amazon: 0838910521 arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Thomas, D., & Brown, J. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. Available through Amazon: 1456458884 arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain

The Hyperlinked Library–Emerging Trends, Emerging Tech – Updated for Fall 2012

Course Overview

“The new tools provide powerful options for working with data, text, sound, and images. …. There is, predictably, an increasing departure in information handling from the simple pattern of read, think, then write. Computers are used for so much more than the traditional notion of “computing.’”

–Michael Buckland, Redesigning Library Services, 1992

What emerging trends are changing library services? What does a connected world of “continuous computing” mean for 21st Century libraries. This course provides a roadmap toward becoming theHyperlinked Library: transparent, participatory, playful, user-centered and human, while still grounded in our foundations and values.

Library scholars have noted the ongoing impact of technology on libraries and have called for a redesign of services to meet the evolving needs of users. Virtual communities have thrived online since the early 1980s. New media and social sites are part of the next incarnation of the World Wide Web, where digital tools allow users to create, change, and publish dynamic content of all kinds.  The evolving Web and related emerging technologies are signifiers of a broader cultural shift: toward an open, collaborative and participatory society. This course examines emerging technologies within a framework of participatory, hyperlinked library service: a model of creating, extending, updating and evaluating libraries via a user-centered approach.

The Hyperlinked Library is an open, participatory institution that welcomes user input and creativity. It is built on human connections and conversations. The organizational chart is flatter and team-based. The collections grow and thrive via user and staff involvement. Librarians are tapped in to user spaces and places online to interact, have presence and point the way.

Casey & Savastinuk describe the participatory service model: “It is a model for library service that encourages constant and purposeful change, inviting user participation in the creation of both the physical and the virtual services they want, supported by consistently evaluating services. It also attempts to reach new users and better serve current ones through improved customer-driven offerings.”

This course will examine various theories of library service, the advent of social networking tools, the creation of online collaboration and communities via those tools and their adoption by libraries as well as the rise of Library 2.0 thinking, a service philosophy born out of discussions of Web 2.0 and participatory library services. Students will experience an immersive learning environment via a wide range of tools. We will discuss the definition of participatory service, explore some key trends that impact the model, and examine what this shift means for libraries and information work in the 21stCentury.

Course Prerequisites: LIBR 200 required. Other prerequisites may be added depending on content.

Course Requirements

Assignments

  • All assignments support Learning Outcome #1 in addition to other SLOs.
  • Context BookStudents will read one book selected from a list provided, and write a 500 word reflection or create a media-based presentation relating the topic and focus of the book to libraries, technology and participatory service. 20 points
  • Reflection BloggingTen 200 word minimum blog posts will serve as a reflection journal for the modules include in our course content. 20 points
  • Emerging Technology/Social Media Plan:  A clearly articulated policy for the use of emerging technologies/social media within a library or information environment can guide the development of participatory services. Students will draft a sample emerging technology/social media plan for the library or environment of their choice. 20 points
  • Director’s BriefStudents will draft a “director’s brief” highlighting and exploring an emerging technology in libraries with emphasis on origins, terminologies and uses in libraries or information environments.  20 points
  • Participation & Seminar EngagementStudents will interact weekly via the course learning community, various social tools as directed, and via optional online meetings. Students will be actively reading and commenting on others’ blog posts. Students will share their work via blogs and other media in a virtual symposium held in the last two weeks of class.  A final reflection post will allow students to self-evaluate their participation and engagement. 20 points

Course Calendar
Dates subject to change 

  • Week 1 – Course Introduction & Foundational Reading
  • Week 2 – Foundational Reading Continued
  • Week 3 – The Hyperlinked Library Model
  • Week 4 – Participatory Service
  • Week 5 – Reaching All Users
  • Week 6 – Transparency
  • Week 7 – Planning for Emerging Technologies 1
  • Week 8 – Planning for Emerging Technologies 2
  • Week 9 – User Experience
  • Week 10 – Learning & New Literacies
  • Week 11 – Mobile & Geo-Social Information Environments
  • Week 12 – The Commons & Digital Curation
  • Week 13 – Reflective Practice & Participatory Service
  • Week 14 – Virtual Symposium (asyncronous)
  • Week 15 – Course Reflections & Wrap Up

Course Grading
Grading will be based on 100 possible points. More information to come as assignments are finalized.

  • Late assignments will lose 10% of point value per day late.
  • If life circumstances require students to request an extension, please do so several days before the assignment is due.

Textbooks and Readings

Foundational readings inlude:

  • Buckland, Michael. Redesigning Library Services: A Manifesto at
    http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literature/Library/Redesigning/html.html
  • Casey, M. E., & Savastinuk, L. C. (2007). Library 2.0 : a Guide to Participatory Library Service.
  • Lankes, R. D., Silverstein, J., & Nicholson, S. (January 01, 2007). Participatory Networks: The Library As Conversation. Information Technology and Libraries, 26,4, 17. (avaliable online)

Each student will read a recent book related to course content and report on it. A list will be provided.

Readings for each course concept will be  posted on the course site. Students are encouraged to share articles, blog posts and sites they find with the class via their blogs.

Course Prerequisites

LIBR 200Other prerequisites may be added depending on content.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, concepts, and ideas of participatory library service.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of emerging technologies and how they relate to information services and environments.
  3. Articulate a planning strategy for services built within the framework of the participatory service model.
  4. Synthesize current thinking about cultural and technological change within a framework of libraries and information work.
  5. Articulate and synthesize current use of and an overview of an emerging technology in the form of a report intended for current awareness and planning.
  6. Use various online tools to experience, discuss, and evaluate course concepts as they relate to library services.

Core Competencies

LIBR 287 supports the following core competencies:

  • C Recognize and describe cultural and economic diversity in the clientele of libraries or information organizations.
  • F Use the basic concepts and principles related to the selection, evaluation, organization, and preservation of physical and digital items and collections.
  • H Demonstrate proficiency in identifying, using, and evaluating current and emerging information and communication technologies.

Tweeting Professors

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/professors-with-personal-tweets-get-high-credibility-marks/30635

So the assistant professor in communications at Elizabethtown College designed anexperiment for 120 students at the college and has just reported the results. It turns out that professors with personal Twitter streams appear to be more credible than those who stick to business. The study, co-authored with Jamie Bartolino, one of her students, appears in the most recent issue of Learning, Media and Technology.

The researchers created three accounts on Twitter for three fictional “professors” named Caitlin Milton, Caitlyn Milton, and Katelyn Milton. One account was filled personal tweets (“Feeling good after an early morning swim at the rec center”), the second with scholarly ones (“Working on a study about how social-networking sites can be used in educational settings.”), and the third with a combination.

To Ms. Johnson’s surprise, when the students were surveyed, they rated the personal professor the highest on measures of competence, trustworthiness, and caring—which adds up to credibility.

This is from last year, but it’s nice to see supporting evidence for one of my beliefs about teaching: bringing even a little bit of yourself can be beneficial to students and the learning environment.

New Research Article: The Impact and Effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian Public Libraries

I am very happy to have a new article co-written with Warren Cheetham  in Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, an online peer-reviewed journal.

Download the PDF here: http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/EBLIP/article/view/11728/13253

Abstract

Objective – With adoption of the program world-wide, the Learning 2.0 model has been lauded by library professionals as a mechanism to educate library staff and transform libraries. This study, part of the 2009 CAVAL Visiting Scholar project, seeks to measure the impact and legacy of the model within Australian public libraries to understand what benefits, changes and effects occur.

Methods – A national Web-based survey for those who had participated in a learning 2.0 program.

Results – The national survey had 384 respondents, and a total of 64 respondents were identified as the public library staff data set for this article. Public library staff reported success in the program and described feelings of increased confidence, inclusivity, and a move to use emerging technologies as part of library service. 

Conclusion – The analysis yields the following thematic areas of impact and effect:
personal practice is enhanced with knowledge and confidence; impact is mainly personal, but organisational changes may follow; the library is using the tools to varying degrees of success, and organizational blocks prevent use of tools. These finding offer evidence that Learning 2.0 programs can have a positive effect on library staff and subsequently on the organization itself.

SJSU SLIS Presentation at PLA

Today and tomorrow I’m doing a mini-presentation at our SJSU SLIS Booth in the exhibit hall. It’s based on trends talks I do as well as my class “The Hyperlinked Library.”

The slides are here: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/239835/StephensTrendsTech2012PLA.pdf

I’m happy to chat with anyone about our programs and opportunities for learning. Please stop by the booth and say hi if you can.

Dr. Michael Stephens Thursday, March 15 3:00 pm–3:30 pm  & Friday, March 16 11:30 am–12:00 pm

Hyperlinked Libraries: Emerging Tech & Emerging Trends: What trends and technologies are impacting public library service? What does the evolution of library physical and virtual space look like? This presentation explores the hyperlinked library model through a lens of participatory service, transparency and emerging technologies.

 

Nominate Keynote Speakers for the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference

Have you heard a great presentation lately? Do you know someone who would inspire a global audience? As we gear up for the highly anticipated Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference, we invite you to nominate your choice of keynote presenters.

The Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference will be held October 3-5, 2012. It will be an entirely online conference spanning multiple time zones and languages. Global participation for both presenters and attendees is encouraged. Please keep in mind that keynote presenters do not have to speak English; they may present in their native language.

To make your nominations, please fill out and submit the online form. All nominations must be received by Thursday, April 12, 2012.  Self-nominations will also be accepted.

As you think about keynote nominees, you may also consider submitting your own presentation. This global conference presents a unique opportunity to showcase the excellent research and work that you do every day. Everyone is welcome to submit a talk proposal, and scheduling slots will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Start preparing now, so you’ll be ready when the call for presentation proposals comes out on May 1.

The Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference presentations will cover six subject strands:

  • STRAND 1: Libraries – Physical and Virtual Learning Spaces
  • STRAND 2: Librarians & Information Professionals – Evolving Professional Roles in Today’s World
  • STRAND 3: Content & Creation – Organizing and Creating Information
  • STRAND 4: Changing Delivery Methods
  • STRAND 5: User Centered Access
  • STRAND 6: Mobile and Geo-Social Information Environments

To view examples of presentation topics for each subject strand, click here.

The Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference is free to attend and open to the public. To participate in the conference and receive news and updates, please join the Library 2.0 Ning Network by clicking “Sign up” located on the upper right side of the web page.

The San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science is a founding partner of the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference. The nationally ranked school offers two fully online master’s degrees, a fully online certificate program, and a doctoral program: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS), Master of Archives and Records Administration (MARA), Post-Master’s Certificate in Library and Information Science, and the San Jose Gateway PhD Program.

For more information about the Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference, please email us at SanJoseSLIS@gmail.com. Please share this announcement with colleagues and friends.

See You at PLA! Presentation at SJSU SLIS Exhibit Space

If you’re attending PLA next week, please look for me at the SJSU SLIS Exhibit Space at Booth 2100. I’m doing a short presentation:

Dr. Michael Stephens Thursday, March 15 3:00 pm–3:30 pm  & Friday, March 16 11:30 am–12:00 pm

Hyperlinked Libraries: Emerging Tech & Emerging Trends: What trends and technologies are impacting public library service? What does the evolution of library physical and virtual space look like? This presentation explores the hyperlinked library model through a lens of participatory service, transparency and emerging technologies.

I’m happy to chat with anyone about our programs and opportunities for learning.