Internet Librarian International – Call for Speakers

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Information Today invites you to submit your presentation ideas for this year’s Internet Librarian International - THE innovation and technology conference that attracts hundreds of global library and information professionals each year.

Taking place in London on 20 – 22 October 2014, we’re seeking practical case studies, How-Tos and discussions in a variety of new formats – see below – that promote the exchange of knowledge and experience, and demonstrate how you are using transformative new ideas and services to make a positive impact on your organisation. The full Call for Speakers is available here.

How are services evolving? What changes can we make to ensure our communities thrive? Which new technologies and business models are the most appropriate now, and where should we focus our attentions next?

As always, we welcome contributions from all types of libraries – public, academic, government, national or commercial – as well as those working outside a ‘traditional’ library setting.

This year’s Call for Speakers has four main categories:

  • Transforming library and information services and roles
  • Innovation in content
  • Innovative technologies
  • Innovation in search and discovery
  • PLUS Case studies and workshops

But this is just a summary of our focus; read more detail and suggestions here.

We’re looking for a range of presentation formats, including:

  • 30-minute scene-setting themed papers
  • 15-minute case study presentations
  • Teachmeet/unconference contributors
  • Workshop leaders
  • Panellists

The submissions deadline is 11 April 2014, but don’t delay your submission until then. Now’s the time to share your expertise, and be a part of this influential and forward-thinking event -Submit today.

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The User is Still Not Broken by Brian Kenney

Don’t miss Brian Kenney’s new column:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/libraries/article/60780-the-user-is-still-not-broken.html

Meet People Where They Are—Not Where We Want Them to Be

Libraries are very good at organizing and presenting content in anticipation of users’ needs. From cataloging resources to creating booklists, to offering workshops and classes, we’re all about meeting people where we think they may be. The trouble is, not all individuals fit into our elaborate schema.

It’s difficult to genuinely meet people where they are. It’s far easier to set up a system that we think might help most users—and a whole lot cheaper. Meeting people where they are can take a serious commitment of staff time.

In the past decade, libraries have experimented with creating alternatives to their “build it and they will come” paradigm. Teen librarians, working with teen advisory groups, have encouraged their users to help determine teen programs and services. Letting the public have a role in ordering materials is one way to open a library’s collection to its readers. Book-a-librarian programs allow us to focus on our users’ needs in more depth than is possible at a reference desk.

For several years, my library provided drop-in e-reader help. But in the past 12 months, interest in e-readers has taken a nosedive, so we expanded the program to offer help for other types of devices. The response has been enthusiastic: the public has hauled in cameras, phones, laptops, and iPads. No amount of handouts, FAQs on our Web site, and classes could begin to address the variety of questions we have received, and few programs have generated gratitude.

Technology isn’t something we offer, it’s something we do, and helping people understand how to use their technology is perfectly in line with what libraries do best: respond to people’s needs.

News: Library Effect Launches

Jan Holmquist shared this with me:

There is a new attempt to break out of the echo chamber and share the many different sides of library activities and the positive effects they have  on the communities they serve.library-effect-600 The goal of The Library Effect is to share stories about the many facets of library activities — and their outcomes — with a general audience. Good luck to Shannon K. McDonough (@shnmcd) with this fine initiative.

Read the first edition of The Library Effect here: http://thelibraryeffect.com/ – Then share with your library and non-library friends.

https://twitter.com/libraryeffect

From Michael : In the first edition you can read why Jan Holmquist thinks the library is the hummingbird (http://thelibraryeffect.com/2014/01/16/the-library-is-the-hummingbird/). You can also read about the library as community living room and mobilizing a volunteer army. Good luck to all involved with this initiative.

WISE Workshop: Designing Online Courses for Diverse Communities of Learners

WISE

 

Here are the slides from my WISE workshop presentation:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensWISEWorkshop14.pdf

 

Sponsored by the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) Consortium

As LIS programs become more entrepreneurial, reaching more diverse groups of learners, LIS educators are challenged to design their courses for diverse communities. There are many possible dimensions of diversity—different learner work contexts with different value structures (e.g., library vs. business), different cultural contexts when courses have a global reach, differences in learner demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), and differences in technology use outside of class, including social media. How does online course design take into account this diversity? This panel of experienced online educators will provide examples of how they have worked to address diverse communities of learners in their course designs and encourage interaction with members of the audience.

Moderator: Nicole Cooke, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Presenters: Lilia Pavlovsky, Rutgers University; Michael Stephens, San Jose State University; and Jill Hurst-Wahl, Syracuse University

 

http://www.wiseeducation.org

 

 

 

 

 

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Circulating Ideas: The Michaels!

ideasHonored to be interviewed with Michael Casey for an episode of “Circulating Ideas” by Steve Thomas.

http://www.circulatingideas.com/2014/01/episode-36-michael-stephens-and-michael.html

photo by Cindi Trainor

Dr. Michael Stephens is an Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University. His research focuses on use of emerging technologies in libraries and technology learning programs. He currently writes the monthly column “Office Hours” in Library Journal exploring issues, ideas and emerging trends in library and information science education. Stephens has spoken about emerging technologies, innovation, and libraries to national and international audiences. He is fascinated by library buildings and virtual spaces that center around users, participation, creating content, and encouraging the heart. Michael’s Tame the Web blog is here: http://tametheweb.com.

Michael Casey is currently the Information Technology Director for the Gwinnett County Public Library in metropolitan Atlanta. Named a Mover & Shaker by Library Journal in March 2007, he co-authored (with Laura SavastinukLibrary 2.0: A Guide to Participatory Library Service and is a contributor to Library 2.0 and Beyond. He and Michael Stephens co-authored a monthly column in Library Journal titled “The Transparent Library“. He has written and spoken extensively on the subject of modern library services. Michael holds an MLS from Southern Connecticut State, an MA in Political Science from Pennsylvania State University, and a BA from Duquesne University. His family, friends, travel and hobbies can all be seen in his photos on Flickr.

Upcoming Presentations: Winter & Spring 2014

January 21, 2014:  Designing Online Courses for Diverse Communities of Learners, Sponsored by the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) Consortium. Moderator: Nicole Cooke, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Presenters: Lilia Pavlovsky, Rutgers University; Michael Stephens, San Jose State University; and Jill Hurst-Wahl, Syracuse University. ALISE Conference, Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.

January 22, 2014: MOOCs as LIS Professional Development Platforms: Evaluating and Refining SJSU’s First Not-for-Credit MOOC, with Kyle Jones. ALISE Conference, Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.

January 23, 2014: New Landscapes: Exploring MOOCs as LIS and Professional Development Spaces, with Kyle Jones, Joanne de Groot, Jennifer Branch. ALISE Conference, Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.

January 23, 2014: Participatory and Transformative Engagement in Libraries and Museums: Exploring and Expanding the Salzburg Curriculum, with R. David Lankes. ALISE Conference, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

February 21, 2014: Cook Memorial Public Library District Staff Development Day, Libertyville, Illinois.

February 27, 2014: Learning Everywhere: Learning Always, UC Santa Barbara Library Speaker Series, Santa Barbara, California.

March 13, 2014:  Hyperlinked Learning Experiences at Public Libraries: MOOCs & Beyond, Public Library Association Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana.

March 24-26, 2014: Keynote, ILEAD U 2014, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois.

April 11, 2014: Learning Everywhere: Of MOOCs & Mayhem, Texas Library Association Conference, San Antonio, Texas.

April 24, 2014: Emerging Roles: Key Insights from Librarians in a Massive Open Online Course. 16th Distance Library Services Conference, Denver, Colorado.

May 1 & 2, 2014: Presentations for  Municipality of Chatham-Kent Library Services Division, Ontario.

June 8, 2014: MOOCs Panel. Special Libraries Association Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia.

One Book, Many Zombies by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

In May, I posted about our simulated zombie outbreak (see:
Humans vs Zombies as an Active Learning Event by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson). We adapted the popular Humans vs Zombies game into an experiential-learning event. I am happy to report that we survived our own zombie apocalypse.

I wanted to share our write up in American Libraries, One Book, Many Zombies . I am also wanted to share this video we created that summarizes our zombie game.

World War M: Humans vs Zombies (Summary Video)

Troy A. Swanson is Department Chair and Teaching & Learning Librarian at Moraine Valley Community College. He is the author of the book, Managing Social Media in Libraries. You can follow him on Twitter at @t_swanson.

People, Libraries & Technology – A Weblog by Michael Stephens