Your Curriculum is Not About 3D Printers or Zombies By TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending the Texas Library Association Conference in San Antonio. While there, I had the opportunity to talk with Justin Hoenke (among many folks) who is also a contributor to this blog. We discussed his work at the Chattanooga Public Library and, specifically about the use of their 3D printer. Listening to him talk, it really struck me that at the basic level Justin does not really care about the 3D printer. The 3D printer is all well and good, but the thing that he is really after is the learning, the creativity, that the printer enables. Justin told me, “if libraries want to get into the maker movement, they don’t really need a 3D printer. They really just need a roll of duct tape and some raw materials to use in building” (this quote was given to me over drinks so please take it as more representative of his larger points as opposed to an exact quote). It was clear to me that Justin was not really a technologist, even if he uses technology to do his work. He gets excited about the things that people can do with the technology (even if the technology is a roll of duct tape).

This year my library received two awards for our campus-wide zombie game . We received the Proquest Innovation in Libraries Award from ACRL  and the Innovation of the Year Award from our own campus. I mention these awards partly because of a character flaw where I like to show off. But I also bring these up because our library’s zombie game is comparable to Justin’s 3D printer. We didn’t organize our game because we wanted to play a game. We did it because we wanted to organize a learning event that enriched the curriculum in a unique way that no other campus department could. We could pull together IT support and student activities while still making the event curricular giving faculty a tool to use to create assignments. Faculty members from across the curriculum created assignments so that their students could participate. This included microbiology, nursing, statistics, massage therapy, criminal justice, writing, speech, and others.

It wasn’t too long ago when it was trendy for administrators within higher education to merge the library with IT departments. Obviously, every institution has their own reasons and goals when they reorganize, but this move always concerned me a little bit. I always have felt that moving libraries outside of the academic division sort of missed what libraries are all about. Moving libraries to IT emphasizes their role as learning infrastructure and DE-emphasizes their role in learning. And I have always thought that the whole point was learning. Perhaps, David Lankes makes the best point in The Atlas of New Librarianship. He notes that librarians can no longer think simply about service communities, but that librarians must focus on the learning needs of those service communities. It’s about curriculum.

So, what’s your curriculum? Your curriculum is simply the learning needs of community. Your curriculum ties together resources, events, swansonphotospace, classes, technology, and other services aimed at learning. Your curriculum recasts the purpose of your library away from stuff, away from content. Your curriculum doesn’t just bring you face-to-face with your community. Your curriculum brings you face-to-face with your learners. And, most importantly, your curriculum is not about 3D printers or zombie games.

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Troy A. Swanson is Department Chair and Teaching & Learning Librarian at Moraine Valley Community College. He is the author of the book,Managing Social Media in Libraries. You can follow him on Twitter at @t_swanson.

News: Outside the Lines

Outsideoutside the lines launches september 2014

Weeklong Celebration Gets Communities Thinking of Libraries 

in a Whole New Way

DENVER–April 14, 2014–Inspired by the urgent need to shift perceptions of libraries, a group of Colorado library marketers and directors have developed a bold, new campaign that reintroduces libraries to their communities and gets people thinking – and talking – about these organizations in a whole new way. Outside the Lines is a weeklong celebration, Sept. 14-20, 2014, demonstrating the creativity and innovation happening in libraries.

Organizations of all types can participate by hosting at least one event or campaign during the week of Sept. 14-20, 2014, that:

  • Gets people thinking – and talking – about libraries in a different way
  • Showcases the library out in the community as well as in the library
  • Highlights how the library is relevant to people’s lives
  • Represents the organization’s local community
  • Is active versus passive – gets people engaged
  • Is extraordinary and unexpected
  • Most importantly, is fun!

Libraries can sign up to participate at getoutsidethelines.org. They can also see a list of participating libraries and view videos that provide creative inspiration. To date, 40 libraries from across the U.S. and Canada have signed up to participate and will announce their Outside the Lines activities in the coming months.

The purpose of Outside the Lines is to reintroduce libraries to local communities by helping people understand how libraries have changed into dynamic centers for engagement, helping libraries better understand how to market themselves and share their stories, and providing a venue for libraries to work together to demonstrate their creativity and innovation.

ABOUT OUTSIDE THE LINES

Outside the Lines is an R-Squared initiative designed by Colorado library marketers and directors that gets libraries “walking the walk” – taking action to show our communities how important libraries are and how they’ve changed.

This celebration takes many of the concepts discussed at RSquared, The Risk & Reward Conference, such as creativity, customer curiosity, culture, community and creative spaces, and puts them into action where they count – in our local communities. Learn more at getoutsidethelines.org.

###

 

 

Contact:

Amber DeBerry, 303-688-7641

adeberry@dclibraries.org

or

Stacie Ledden, 303-405-3286

sledden@anythinklibraries.org

 

 

#TxLA14: Thanks Texas Library Association! Slides & Resources

txlaHow wonderful it is to be back at Texas Library Association! The good folks here know how to throw a great conference. Here are the slides and resources from my talk:

Slides: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensTxLALearning.pdf

The presentation is based in part on these columns:

A Genius Idea?: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

Learning Everywhere: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

Learning to Learn: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-to-learn-office-hours/

Infinite Learning: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/michael-stephens/infinite-learning-office-hours/

Of MOOCs & Mayhem Tomorrow at TxLA

Texas Library Association knows how to throw a conference! So nice to see colleagues and friends. Here’s the abstract for my talk tomorrow morning:

Of MOOCs & Mayhem: Learning Everywhere

9:00 – 9:50 Am

An innovation in online education is the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). These courses can have thousands of people and can be a potentially disruptive and transformational mechanism for large-scale learning. Hear the genesis of MOOCs, the experiences of librarians in an LIS-centered MOOC, and the potential roles for LIS professionals. This emerging landscape is rife with chaos and opportunity!

Michael Stephens, San Jose State University (San Jose, CA).

ILI Final Call for Proposals – TTW is a Proud Blog Supporter of ILI

Submissions deadline this Friday, 11 April 2014

This is the final call for speakers for this year’s Internet Librarian International- THE innovation and technology conference attracting hundreds of global library and information professionals each year.

The full Call for Speakers is available here.

Taking place in London on 20 – 22 October 2014, we’re seeking international case studies, How-Tos and discussions in a variety of new formats – see below – that promote the exchange of knowledge and experience, and demonstrate how you are using transformative new ideas and services to make a positive impact on your organisation. Under the theme, Positive Change: Creating Real Impactwe’re looking for a range of presentation formats, including:

  • 30-minute scene-setting themed papers
  • 15-minute case study presentations
  • Teachmeet/unconference contributors
  • Workshop leaders
  • Panellists

The submissions deadline is this Friday, 11 April 2014 so don’t delay! Now’s the time to share your expertise, and be a part of this influential and forward-thinking event – Submit today.

 

ILI Blog Supporters
Stephen Abram Informed Jo Alcock John DiGiglio Jan Holmquist
Brian Kelly anabelmarsh.flavors.me Shelf Free Michael Stephens Aaron Tay

Office Hours: A Genius Idea

shamingMy new column is up at Library Journal:

Let’s unpack this sweeping suggestion for improving libraries further. What of teaching ability? I advise my students to make sure they take courses in user instruction and technology, no matter where they want to work. Delivering instruction should be a part of every professional’s skill set: in a training room, across the desk, in the stacks, on the fly. Maybe it’s time to add creating a short training session or learning module to the interview process for all librarians, not just those in colleges or schools.

Borrowed from Apple, the Genius Bar concept applied to libraries is not new, but it’s a welcome addition to many library settings. David Weinberger, in “The Library as Platform” (ow.ly/­tBDAe), notes that the Genius Bar might be one of many channels for users to interact with librarians. Libraries such as DOK Delft and others have tried various permutations of walk-in tech ­assistance.

Don’t miss the comments, including this interesting  snippet from a reader named Dan:

“after reading the shaming post, i am conflicted which is more absurd: the original note or all the “followers” and their “likes.” technology has it’s place but you will have to pry the hard-copy, three-dimensional, fixed ink on paper, book from my cold dead, fingers.”

Insert witty reply here.

:-)

Also – a big shout out to Monica Harris and her creation culture course she’s teaching this semester at SJSU SLIS as I prep an introductory module on creation in libraries for our new core LIBR 200 course Information Communities.

“LIS curricula must keep up as well. At San José State University (SJSU), CA, School of Library and Information Science (SLIS), we’re offering a new class entitled “Production of Knowledge and Content in Libraries,” taught by Monica Harris, deputy director, Schaumburg Township District Library, IL. Her syllabus, focused on participation and creativity, runs from digital creation spaces to the Maker movement to a module called the Importance of Informal Learning. Another unit highlights Robotics and Electronics: Arduino, Sensors, and LEGO.”

I am impressed with the framework Monica used to explore knowledge creation in libraries. The students in the course will have some invaluable experience for this new landscape.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

http://librarian-shaming.tumblr.com/post/68672130972/i-want-to-replace-all-librarians-with-tech-people

Fair Use is in the Eye of the Beholder…or Not by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

YouTubeCapture

I have a decent understanding of copyright and the process of determining fair use, but I didn’t have a good understanding of how YouTube enforces and adjudicates copyright disputes. I’ll own up to my naiveté, but even after acknowledging this, I am still troubled by YouTube’s approach to copyright enforcement.

I thought about titling this post, “I Fought the Law and the Law Won,”
but the problem is that this whole thing isn’t really about the law at all. In YouTube Land, it doesn’t really matter if your use of copyrighted material falls under fair use or not. What matters is that content creators can use YouTube’s enforcement tools to shutdown your account and make life so difficult that you avoid any use of outside content all together. YouTube has become the default, national forum for online video, and, as such, their approach to copyright has a chilling effect on speech and public discourse.

Our library has 93 videos totaling well over a 100 of hours of content on YouTube, but my problems stem from a total of 45-75 seconds of video. Actually, about 25 seconds of a particular video has allowed Sony Music to put a copyright strike on my library’s YouTube account. My library’s YouTube account is still in place and our videos are still visible, but we are no longer able to upload videos longer than 15 minutes, which pretty much limits most of our primary uses.  When the violations appeared, I probably should have clicked on the “acknowledge” button, which may have helped to avoid the  strike . But, our use falls within fair use, and I decided to challenge the claims against our use.

The following copyright violations were identified through YouTube’s automated system:

1. A lecture given by our campus police chief where he shows a YouTube video (ironically) and YouTube’s bots caught the music in the background of that video. So, the bots caught music in a video within our video. They called this a misuse of 3rd party content, even though the video within our video is made freely available by City of Houston and the music in question is a very small percentage of the work in the background of a video.
Our video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uSYkqR33ec
Video within the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VcSwejU2D0

2. A lecture and dance performance from a dance company visiting our college. YouTube’s bots caught the music used by a dancer in a demonstration. After filling out YouTube’s forms claiming fair use, this video was eventually given the green light. We won this one after appealing.
Our video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rl_h7DcTcgw

3. (This is the one that put a strike on our account.) A student created video hosted on our account. This was a video project created for a speech class that used 25 seconds of Michael Jackson’s Thriller. When I uploaded it, I knew that this one might be a problem, but I felt that we were safe under the tests of fair use (see Stanford’s Measuring Fair Use: The Four Factors ). I have taken this one all the way through the appeal process and have been given a strike.

Of course, I recognize that YouTube/Google is a private company that can set their own rules on their platform, but I also find it troubling that they make money off of all of the content freely given to them. As someone who has given them useful content and driven traffic to their site, I feel that they have a responsibility to me and to the millions of other users like me. They have a responsibility to write rules that do not allow huge companies like Sony to bully their way through the online world.

Just a few months ago, Lawrence Lessig won a suit against Liberation Music in an effort to fight this kind of copyright abuse (see Lawrence Lessig Wins Damages for Bogus Youtube Takedown). Unfortunately, Lawrence Lessig doesn’t work for my library, and it is unlikely that the swansonphotoElectronic Frontier Foundation will swoop in and fight for fair use on my library’s behalf. More than likely, I will have to wait six months until this copyright strike expires, and then will have to become very strict with future videos. The weighing of fair use under US copyright law won’t really matter.

One positive result from this experience is that our librarians have a new example to use when talking to faculty about scholarly communication issues. Our campus has new justification for a campus-hosted video solution that is independent of YouTube. I am fortunate enough to work at a college large enough to implement our own video management system, which is not always possible at smaller colleges or smaller public libraries who depend on services like YouTube. None-the-less, the overall result for us is a chilling effect that helps to avoid this administrative paper chase.  

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Troy A. Swanson is Department Chair and Teaching & Learning Librarian at Moraine Valley Community College. He is the author of the book,Managing Social Media in Libraries. You can follow him on Twitter at @t_swanson.

 

Thanks ILEAD U!

Thanks to all the great folks participating in ILEAD U for the warm welcome the morning for my keynote.

The slides are here:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensLearningEverywhereILEADU.pdf

The presentation is based in part on these columns:

A Genius Idea?: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/03/opinion/michael-stephens/a-genius-idea-office-hours/

Learning Everywhere: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

Learning to Learn: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/06/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-to-learn-office-hours/

Infinite Learning: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/michael-stephens/infinite-learning-office-hours/

Using an Apple TV on The 2nd Floor of the Chattanooga Public Library

Here’s one of the neat little things we’re testing out on The 2nd Floor of the Chattanooga Public Library: using an Apple TV/Projector/iPad/blank wall combination to stream random things while the library is open.

This morning, we used our streaming service Hoopla to show folks just how awesome your library card can be.  Then we listened to some Daft Punk for a bit and finally switched it over to a complete walk through of The Legend of Zelda which is running as we speak.

Why are we doing this?  We’ve got a lot of wall space on The 2nd Floor and more importantly it starts conversations among our library guests and our staff.  When our staff shares an example of a library service that we offer of something that interests us personally we open up the library to some great conversations.  In those conversations, we make connections with our community. These connections make our place in the community stronger.

-Post by Justin Hoenke, Tame the Web Contributor

People, Libraries & Technology – A Weblog by Michael Stephens