Learning 2.0 in Australia



US LEARNING 2.0 RESEARCHER DR MICHAEL STEPHENS APPOINTED 2009 CAVAL VISITING SCHOLAR

Melbourne, 30 March 2009 – Internationally recognised US Web 2.0 commentator, writer and library academic, Dr Michael Stephens, has been appointed the 2009 CAVAL Visiting Scholar.

In a world first for CAVAL and its project partners CityLibraries  Townsville and Dominican University Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Dr Stephens’ research project will seek to measure the value and effect of Learning 2.0 programs in Australian libraries.”The intent of this study is to understand the impact on library staff  and institutional culture and makeup after a Learning 2.0 program”, Dr  Stephens says.
“The critical questions for libraries looking forward are to what extent  has Learning 2.0 impacted institutional culture and staff confidence, and to what degree has it improved the ability of library staff to use emerging technologies?”
Dr Stephens notes that “More than 500 libraries in 15 countries have implemented Learning 2.0 programs in 2 years but we know very little about their effectiveness.”
“Nearly 10% of these Learning 2.0 programs are Australian, ranging from large State and University libraries through to public and special libraries and a small school library in New South Wales.” First developed by the Public Library of Charlotte Mecklenburg County under a Creative Commons license in 2006, Learning 2.0 is an online learning program that encourages library staff to explore and learn about emerging Web 2.0 technologies.  Web 2.0, also called the Read/Write Web or Social Computing, enables users of all ages and walks of life to create, change and publish their own Web content.  Blogs and social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook are common examples.
Working with co-researcher Warren Cheetham from CityLibraries Townsville, Dr Stephens’  research aims to develop a world first model for what he terms “an exemplary Learning 2.0 program for Australian libraries.”
For more information about the original Learning 2.0 program, visit
http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.com/

ABOUT THE PROJECT PARTNERS:

CAVAL is an Australian not-for-profit company established in 1978 to support leading libraries in Australia, New Zealand and Asia.  CAVAL is owned jointly by 11 Australian universities and provides a range of specialised services to the library sector including storage and digital preservation, training and consulting.
CityLibraries Townsville was formed by the merger of the Townsville City Council and Thuringowa City Council in March 2008.  Three library branches, mobile services plus a virtual branch serve the whole of Townsville – from the inner city to Magnetic Island, from the suburbs to the rural communities.  Each branch offers specialist services and
facilities that provide for a diverse community.
Articles:
Stephens, M. (2013). “Exemplary Practice for Learning 2.0: Based on a Cumulative Analysis of the Value and Effect of ‘23 Things’ Programs in Libraries,” Reference and User Services Quarterly53,(2).
Stephens, M. & Cheetham, W. (2012). Benefits and results of Learning 2.0: a case study of CityLibrariesLearning – discover*play*connect. Australian Library Journal, 61(1), 6-15.
Stephens, M. & Cheetham, W. (2012). The Impact and effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian public libraries. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 7(1).
Stephens, M., & Cheetham, W. (2011). The impact and effect of learning 2.0 programs in Australian academic libraries. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 17(1), 31-63.
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