All posts by Michael

Upcoming Presentations Fall 2014

September 19:  Opening Session: “The Future of UX in Libraries: Learning Everywhere.” SEFLIN Virtual Conference UX: Seeing Your Library Through the User’s Eyes.

October 8: “The Hyperlinked Library” COSLINE
2014 Library Development Directors Conclave, Cape May, New Jersey.

October 10: Plenary Session: “Driving Change, Creating Experience, Moving Forward.” West Virginia Library Association, Snowshoe Mountain, West Virginia.

October 13: Presentation for West Virginia University Library in Morgantown, West Virginia.

October 23: Keynote: “Learning Everywhere: The Power of Hyperlinked Libraries.” Virginia Library Association, Williamsburg, Virginia.

October 27: “Hyperlinked Library MOOC Research.” Internet Librarian, virtual presentation.

November 7: “Hyperlinked Learning Experiences at Public Libraries: MOOCs & Beyond.” With Brian Kenney. New York Library Association Conference, Saratoga Springs, New York.

It’s Here! The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition #NMChz

From Michael: Download the new NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition. I served on the expert panel to select the topics: go.nmc.org/2014arl 

The New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich are releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition at a special session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress 80th General Conference and Assembly. This is the first edition of the NMC Horizon Report that delves into the realm of academic and research libraries in a global context.

The report describes findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving library leaders and staff a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report was designed to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.

“Education professionals across the world have used the higher education editions of the NMC Horizon Report for years as a springboard for discussion around important trends and challenges,” says Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Officer of the NMC and co-principal investigator for the project. “Finally we have been able to produce a report aimed directly at the needs of academic and research libraries — and what we have found is that academic and research libraries are leveraging new technology in some very important and creative ways.”

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption for Academic and Research Libraries
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition identifies “Increasing Focus on Research Data Management for Publications” and “Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery” as fast trends driving changes in academic and research libraries over the next one to two years. The “Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record” and “Increasing Accessibility of Research Content” are mid-range trends expected to accelerate technology use in the next three to five years; and “Continual Progress in Technology, Standards, and Infrastructure” and the “Rise of New Forms of Multidisciplinary Research” are long-range trends that will be impacting libraries for five years and beyond.

“The trends identified by the expert panel indicate that libraries are doing a better job at making their content and research accessible, whether through mobile apps, enriched catalogs, linking data, and user friendly websites or by creating more spaces and opportunities for discovery,” notes Rudolf Mumenthaler, Professor for Library Science at HTW Chur and co-principal investigator for the report. “The outcomes of the report are very compelling and it is an honor for HTW Chur to be deeply involved in this project.”

Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption In Academic and Research Libraries
A number of challenges are acknowledged for presenting barriers to the mainstream use of technology in academic and research libraries. “Embedding Academic and Research Libraries in the Curriculum” and “Rethinking the Roles and Skills of Librarians” are perceived as solvable challenges — those which we both understand and know how to solve. “Capturing and Archiving the Digital Outputs of Research as Collection Material” and “Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery” are considered difficult challenges, which are defined as well understood but with solutions that are elusive. Described as wicked challenges are “Embracing the Need for Radical Change” and “Maintaining Ongoing Integration, Interoperability, and Collaborative Projects,” which are complex to define, much less address.

“ETH-Bibliothek is proud to be a partner of this report,” shares Andreas Kirstein, Vice Director and Head of Media and IT Services at ETH-Bibliothek, and co-principal investigator of the project. “By articulating some of the most daunting challenges that academic and research libraries face, we are already making progress toward solving them.”

Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries
Additionally, the report identifies “Electronic Publishing” and “Mobile Apps” as technologies expected to enter mainstream use in the first horizon of one year or less. “Bibliometrics and Citation Technologies” along with “Open Content” are seen in the second horizon of two to three years; “The Internet of Things” as well as “Semantic Web and Linked Data” are seen emerging in the third horizon of four to five years.

The subject matter in this report was identified through a qualitative research process designed and conducted by the NMC that engages an international body of experts in libraries, education, technology, research, business, and other fields around a set of research questions designed to surface significant trends and challenges and to identify emerging technologies with a strong likelihood of adoption in academic and research libraries. The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Editiondetails the areas in which these experts were in strong agreement.

“This first library edition of the Horizon Report marks some important evolutionary steps,” says Lambert Heller, head of Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover and co-principal investigator of the project. “Academic and research libraries are now being seen as incubators for experimenting with emerging technologies and are even leading the way at many university campuses across the world.”

The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition is available online, free of charge, and is released under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution.

> Download the Report (PDF)

Thumbnail CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 by Andreas Wecker

#IFLALimerick Thanks IFLA Information Literacy Conference!

Thanks to everyone at the Information Literacy Section Satellite Meeting hosted by Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Republic of Ireland. I have thoroughly enjoyed the sessions and the conversations!

http://iflasatellitelimerick.com

Here are the slides from my keynote talk this morning:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/StephensLearningEverywhereIFLAInfoLIT.pdf

Now it’s on to Lyon!

“Outside The Lines” Inspires Libraries Nationwide

As of August 5, 2014, more than 80 organizations from across the U.S. and Canada have signed up to participate in Outside the Lines, a weeklong celebration demonstrating the creativity and innovation happening in libraries. The campaign is designed to reintroduce libraries to their communities and get people thinking – and talking – about libraries in a whole new way.

Outside the Lines, scheduled to take place September 14-20, 2014, is designed to help people understand how libraries have changed into dynamic centers for engagement. Participating organizations will connect with their communities through creative, unexpected activities meant to demonstrate how libraries are more relevant than ever before.

View the press release here: http://getoutsidethelines.org/sites/default/files/OTL_snapshot_FINAL.pdf

Librarian I (two positions) – White Plains Public Library NY – Apply by August 13

The Library, with a staff of 42 FTE, attracts nearly 30,000 people to its programs and circulates over 730,000 items. The Library includes the Trove, a library for children, and the Edge, an innovative library for teens that includes a digital media lab. The final phase of its capital campaign will create a Learning Commons for adults as well as a café and bookstore.

Special consideration will be given to candidates with experience, training, or interest in any of the following: digital media, emerging technologies, services to teens, services to adults 55+, and local history. Experience in instruction is a plus, as is fluency in Spanish.

http://metro.org/jobs/librarian-i-two-posistions-white-plains-public-library-619/

ILI’s Keynote Speakers

Internet Librarian International will take place in October in London.

2014 Theme – Positive Change: Creating Real Impact

  • UNDERSTAND the changes you can make to ensure your communities thrive
  • LEARN about emerging models and roles that meet the changing demands of end-users
  • HEAR how libraries – and librarians – must change to be future ready
  • TAKE HOME new skills and ideas for transformative new services to impact positively on your organisation

The Dark Matter of the Internet
Michael Edson, 
Smithsonian Institution; Open Knowledge Foundation; Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), USA

According to Michael, history is defined by periods in which we thought we had a pretty good idea of what was going on, punctuated by brief moments when we realised we really didn’t have a clue – we’re going through one of those moments right now, and it’s all wrapped up with the internet and scale. Like dark matter, the internet has a force, a mass, and a capability that is often unseen or undetected. For today’s organisations, success comes down to how well we harness the dark matter of the internet and the collaborative, social, peer-to-peer and read/write opportunities it presents. Join us to hear Michael’s thoughts on how the internet’s dark matter is the future of our libraries and information environments.

Digital Inclusion – The Big Mission
Rachel NeamanGo ON UK


Rachel Neaman is the newly-appointed CEO of Go ON UK, the digital inclusion charity. Prior to joining Go ON UK, Rachel worked at the UK’s Department of Health, where she was responsible for developing digital strategy, policy and guidance on transforming public services, as well as on assisted digital and digital inclusion. In this keynote, Rachel will explore how digital skills are empowering people, businesses and countries and describes a roadmap to digital inclusion and prosperity which will have resonance for information professional from all sectors.

Founded and Chaired by Baroness Lane-Fox, Go ON UK is the UK’s Digital Skills Alliance, dedicated to inspiring and supporting people and organisations that want to share their digital skills with others.

Further information about Internet Librarian International can be seen at: www.internet-librarian.com

 

Johnson County’s Human Face of the Library


JCLFrom Office Hours “Reflective Practice:”

PUTTING A FACE ON THE LIBRARY

This reminds me that the library should be human. It means that behind the keyboard, behind the blog, and behind the Facebook page, there’s a person ready to have a conversation: ready to help, ready to listen.

For example, New Zealand’s Christchurch City Libraries’ Twitter page includes the photos of all of the official “tweeters” for the library. I toured Christchurch recently. The city suffered in the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The libraries there adapted, sometimes changing locations, sometimes working in adverse conditions. Through it all, there has continued to be this strong Twitter presence that includes the human face of the library: those six smiling folks with their initials beside the thumbnail pics. They sign their tweets, in effect saying, “This is what I have to say. I’m representing the library, but this is me and this is my sort of human face on the library.”

It pains me when I encounter librarians who refuse to share their photo online or wear a name tag while on duty. If we’re seeking to build that human connection, that human relationship, it should start there. Stephen Abram said it best to me over dinner one night: “Would you go to doctors or seek out lawyers who refused to put their picture ­online?”

So happy to see this beta version of the new Johnson County Public Library Web site go up, including this most human, most engaging “about the staff” page.

Go here and mouse over the pics:

http://beta.jocolibrary.org/about/staff

jcl2

Sean Casserley, County Librarian, remarked about this on a Facebook when I shared the link:

Yes, we talk about this and thought that since you have your face in the real world it would be OK if it was in the virtual world. Our staff was awesome and really embraced the idea. I am really proud of them. Real people serving real people is how we roll at JCL.

Roll on, JCL! This is a model to replicate.