Categories Information Literacy

31 posts

Posts about information literacy– what it means, how to teach information literacy, etc.

Fake News and Social Media Analytics by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

What do social media analytics tell us about fake news? How can these analytics help libraries and librarians? What is the Social Media Command Center? These are a few questions explored in my interview with Nathan Carpenter who is Director of Convergent Media for the School of Communication at Illinois State University. This interview is available at: Circulating Ideas episode 123: Nathan Carpenter. This interview is part of a series I am doing on fake news & information literacy. My previous interviews can be found here: Circulating Ideas episode 116: Laura Lauzen-Collins (Your Brain and Fake News) Circulating Ideas episode 113: […]

Your Brain and Fake News by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

How do the ways your brain processes information contribute to the spread of fake news? How can we compensate for the short cuts we often take in processing information? What are the implications for librarians? These are a few of the questions psychologist Laura Lauzen-Collins helps us consider in my interview with her on the Circulating Ideas podcast. This interview is available at: Circulating Ideas episode 116: Laura Lauzen-Collins.  This interview is part of a series I am doing on fake news & information literacy. My previous interviews can be found here: Circulating Ideas episode 113: Bill Badke (Fake News […]

Fake News, Information Literacy and Teaching College Students by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

Is expertise no longer relevant? What is the difference between expertise and authority? How do we introduce students to these ideas within a world where fake news is prevalent? These are some of questions answered by Bill Badke in my interview with him on the Circulating Ideas podcast. This interview is available at: Circulating Ideas episode 113: William Badke. William Badke is Associate Librarian at Trinity Western University, Canada, with responsibility for information resources and research training at the Associated Canadian Theological Schools. He is author of numerous articles and the widely used textbook, Research Strategies: Finding your Way through […]

Fake News, Journalism, and Libraries by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

As information disseminators, curators and creators, journalists and librarians often walk the same ground as these professions seek to serve communities. I was fortunate to interview Jeremy Shermak, Moody College of Communication Doctoral Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin about journalism, fake news, libraries, and “truth.” This interview is available at: Circulating Ideas Podcast episode 108: Jeremy Shermak. This interview is part of a series I am doing on fake news & information literacy. My first interview can be found here: Circulating Ideas episode 104: Lane Wilkinson. —————————– Troy A. Swanson is Department Chair and Teaching & Learning […]

Fake News, Information Literacy, and Epistemology by TTW contributor Troy Swanson

I was excited to be a guest host on the Circulating Ideas podcast where I interviewed Lane Wilkinson,Director of Library Instruction at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Listen to our conversation here: Circulating Ideas episode 104: Lane Wilkinson. Lane and I discussed how librarians relate to knowledge in a time of fake news and alternative facts. “How information contributes to knowledge should be of the utmost concern for librarians. After all, librarians have deep-rooted affinities for both information and knowledge-creation…Patrons do not want misinformation or disinformation; they do not want to be deceived” (Lane Wilkinson, “Theories of Knowledge in Library and […]

What #journalists can learn from #librarians by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

I have written about the connections between journalism and libraries previously on this blog (see “The Relationship Model: What Journalism Can Teach Us“). The ways that society is interfacing with and consuming information are shaping both professions in parallel ways. This week I have stumbled upon two pieces that pull together journalism and librarianship and help orient both for the future. First amendment protections are one area where the journalism and librarianship have long shared philosophical connections. This is why when I read Barbara Fister’s brilliant insights on the PEN America report on free speech on college campuses I quickly shared her […]

Our Sorting Hat: Hogwarts Houses, Information Literacy, and ALA Orlando by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

I just returned from ALA Annual in Orlando this week, and since we were in Orlando, I couldn’t escape the reach of the Harry Potter marketing machine and the equally as pervasive reach (all across the conference) of the Harry Potter fandom. (For the uninitiated, please note that these are very different things.) Over drinks, conversation turned the world of Harry Potter, which often started with identifying one’s Hogwarts’ House. Of course, I was not aware that I was a member of a Hogwarts’ House. This was quickly remedied by taking the test at the Pottermore website and going through the […]

Do Search Engines Make us Feel Smarter Than We Are? by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

I have always been interested in the cognitive side of information literacy. How does our existing knowledge, personal beliefs, worldview, and experience intertwine into a decision-making process? How can we understand this process and use it to improve the teaching of information literacy skills? That being said, I really enjoyed David McRaney’s interview with Yale University’s Matthew Fisher as they considered how the online context impacted self-perceptions of knowledge. Here’s a description from the You Are Not so Smart Podcast page: The latest research suggest that though technology probably doesn’t make us stupid, it can, however, cause us to believe […]

Teaching Students About Information: A Reading List by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

Since Heather Jagman and I co-edited our book Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Thing About Information, I have enjoyed several email exchanges with librarians around the country focusing on topics of the book. The larger theme of these conversations center on the larger concepts around information literacy beyond the mechanics of searching. It seems that our profession has long recognized that information literacy is more than using a library, and it is more than just searching Google. But, we are just now entering a time of broader discussion about the dispositions, modes of thinking, and levels of understanding […]

Practicing Critical Information Literacy by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

This is an interview I did with Brian Mathews originally posted on  his blog The Ubiquitous Librarian which is part of the Chronicle Higher Education blog network.   His blog (which has been awesome for many years) will soon end as the Chronicle ends its blog network, so Brian gave me permission to also post the interview here. I am appreciative of the good and honest thinking Brian has provided our profession over the years. BM: You have stated that librarians have long been champions of intellectual freedom and that you see critical information literacy as an extension of this value. […]